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Maintaining accreditation

Once a teacher has gained accreditation, whether it be at proficient, highly accomplished or lead teacher, they have to maintain it.

The process of maintaining accreditation acknowledges teachers’ autonomy in shaping their continuing growth and development as a professional. The developmental framework of the Australian professional standards for teachers provides a reference point, against which teachers can grow their professional knowledge, practice and engagement in order to build their own capacity and that of others.

Herein each maintenance cycle provides opportunities for accredited teachers to reflect on and refine their practice against the teaching standards to ensure their ongoing effectiveness in the classroom.

To maintain accreditation, teachers must:

  • demonstrate that their practice continues to meet the standards at the relevant career stage
  • engage in ongoing cycles of focused and standards-based professional development.

School-based culture of professional learning

Professional development (PD) is most effective when it takes place within the context of a strong school-based culture of professional learning that produces positive, substantial changes in student outcomes. This culture supports teachers to:

  • integrate their professional development into their everyday work
  • work together to create coherent curriculum and systems to support their students
  • collaborate in ways that advances all teachers’ collective capacity.

Creating a professional learning culture

Effective schools create professional learning cultures where:

  • professional trust, collaboration, experimentation and critique flourish
  • teachers feel supported in making their teaching practice ‘public’
  • classroom observation and feedback are common place
  • robust evaluation is built into PD activities and is tracked over time.

Maintaining accreditation at proficient teacher

Once teachers gain proficient accreditation and have demonstrated successful teaching practice, they are required to maintain their practice by:

  • engaging in ongoing reflection and self-evaluation against the teaching standards
  • meeting the PD requirements at the proficient career stage.

By maintaining their level of teaching practice, proficient teachers continue to implement effective teaching practices, and evaluate it with others to create an environment where student learning is consistently optimised.

Maintaining accreditation at highly accomplished teacher

Highly accomplished teachers are required to maintain their practice, continuing to demonstrate they are highly effective and skilled classroom practitioners and meet the PD requirements for this stage. They continue to share, model, guide and assist their colleagues.

This is reflected in the proportion of ‘teacher identified professional development’ (TIPD) hours required in a maintenance cycle.

The impact of their ongoing highly accomplished practice will be evident in the professional growth of the teachers they work with, and in improved student outcomes in these classrooms.

Maintaining accreditation at lead teacher

Lead teachers are required to maintain the level of practice they have demonstrated as innovative and exemplary classroom practitioners and meet the PD requirements for this career stage.

The maintenance process acknowledges that once lead teachers are accredited, they will continue to excel and spread their exemplary practice with colleagues, parents/ carers and the community.

This is reflected in the proportion of ‘teacher identified professional development’ (TIPD) hours required in a maintenance cycle and the emphasis on in-school PD.

Due to their ongoing focus and action on improving student outcomes, lead teachers have a significant impact on the profession.

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