Package 2-5: Keeping to a budget

In this task your child will use strategies to add and subtract 4-digit numbers with decimals.

Week 3 - Package 5 - Year 5 and 6 Mathematics - Keeping to a budget

Things you need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task.

Ideal

  • Print out this lesson

  • Blank paper for working out

Back up

  • Blank paper for working out

Before you start

Most things cost money. We need to think about how much money we have to spend on certain things that we need or want. We often use the term budget to indicate how we are going to spend our money.

What your child needs to know and do

Students need to have strategies to add and subtract 4-digit numbers with decimals. Understand that 100 cents is equivalent in value to 1 dollar. Use their knowledge of Australian money. Use the Theatre Prices picture below to solve the problems.


What to do next

Theatre Price List
Admission costs. Stalls Adult eighty two dollars and fifty cents. Child sixty five dollars and fifty cents. Family  two hundred and eighty dollars. Dress circle prices. Adult fifty two dollars and fifty cents. Child forty five dollars and fifty cents. Family of two adults and two children is one hundred and eighty five dollars. Box set prices. Adult sixty five dollars and fifty cents. Child forty eight dollars and fifty cents. Family one hundred and ninety nine dollars. Thatre snack prices are popcorn eleven dollars, soft drink seven dollars fifty, a bag of chocolate is eight dollars, an ice-cream is siz dollars and fifty cents. Family pack of four drinks and 4 ice-creams is fifty five dollars. A DVD is thirty dollars and a program is fifteen dollars.

Image of theatre prices: Distance Education Primary School (2019) NSW Department of Education

  1. A family of four want to go to the theatre. The information above shows the pricing of admission and other costs, such as entry costs and refreshments (food and drink).

  2. One child and one adult go to the theatre. They have a budget of $160 in total to buy their tickets and some snacks. What snacks and tickets might they buy? What are 3 different options for how they could spend their money?

Options for your child

Activity too hard?

Add different items to the menu.

Activity too easy?

Make up more difficult scenarios. Eg. If a group of 12 people and you have $2000. What tickets can you buy for each person and still afford a snack each and 4 programs for the group?

Use other price lists to calculate budgets. Eg. Entry into an amusement park, zoo or a family meal at your favourite restaurant.

Extension/Additional activity

Plan a budget for a birthday party for ten people, 20 people or 100 people. Include the price of decorations, food, drinks, entertainment and anything extra you would like or need (napkins, cutlery).

Calculate the total budget for the birthday party.

Explore Moneysmarts task Fun Day Out.

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