Package 1-4: Basketball Toss

In this activity your child will play a game and use a variety of ways to record their scores.

Week 2 - Package 4 - Year 5 & 6 Mathematics - Basketball Toss

Things you need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task

Ideal Back up

pair of socks

Any soft object (stuffed toy, sponge)

basket, bucket or container


a clear space


pencils or markers


Paper to record


Why is this activity important?

Chance activities provide fun opportunities for children to experience the elements of probability. Children use a variety of ways to record their scores and represent it in a graph. Drawing graphs allow us to present information in ways which makes it easier for other people to see what we discovered. It also allows us to interpret what we saw and draw conclusions.

Before you start

Make sure:

  • You set up the activity with ample space (3 meters) and in a safe location

  • Your child has a pencil to record how many tosses successfully get into the basket.


What your child needs to know and do

Watch the video Basketball toss.

What to do next

  • Mark a clear ‘starting line’ for your basketball toss.

  • Take 3 big steps from your starting line and place a basket, bucket or container at the end.

  • Stand at your starting line and throw your socks with your right hand. Example of game

  • Throw your socks, aiming for the basket, 10 times with your right hand.

  • Then, do the same thing 10 times with your left hand.

  • Repeat again. Try throwing backwards and with your eyes closed.

  • Keep a record of your baskets and graph your results on a piece of paper.


Options for your child

Activity too hard? Activity too easy?

Shorten the distance to throw

Lengthen the distance to throw

Follow-up questions to ask your child

  • How many times did you get the ball/sock/toy in the basket throwing it right-handed, left-handed and backwards? Why do you think the scores were different?

  • Why do we draw graphs to represent data?

  • Where else do we see graphs being used? Eg weather report, surveys




Extension/Additional activity

Time yourself running a 10 meter distance (Take 10 big steps to approximate 10 metres).

Record how many seconds it takes to run the 10 meters.

Do this 10 times and record each length of time it takes in seconds.

Draw a line graph to represent the length of time it took for each run.

Did your times slow down or fasten up as you finished your 10 sprints? Why?Graph of time to run 10 metres.

How far did you run in total (if exactly 10m each time)?

Calculate how long it would take to run 100 meters, 500 meters and 1kilometer (1000m) in seconds

Convert these seconds to minutes and hours (60sec=1min, 60min=1hr).

Using Google maps, calculate how many kilometres it is from your house to either a friend’s house, the corner shop, school, train station or your favourite take away.

How long would it take you to run there?

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