Package 2-2: Similes – Part 2

In this package your child will watch a video of a lesson about what a simile is. The teacher will guide your child as they learn how to identify, explain and create examples of similes.

Week 3 - Package 2 - Year 5 & 6 English/literacy - Identifying and analysing simile in texts

Things your child will need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task.

Ideal

Back up

Before your child starts

This lesson is the second of three which aims to build student understanding of how to identify similes and analyse their effect in texts.

What is simile?

A simile is a figure of speech that compares two usually dissimilar things. The comparison starts with like, as, or as if. For example, ‘as soft as silk’ and ‘he ran like the wind’.

Literary devices

Literary devices are used in texts to connect with the reader and convey meaning. As your child reads they may be beginning to recognise literary devices used by authors. Your child may now be beginning to learn how to explain why the author has used the device. In narratives or stories, authors might use literary devices such as personification, similes, alliteration, onomatopoeia and imagery to engage the reader and allow them to visualise the setting and characters.

Figurative language

Figurative language creates comparisons by linking the senses and concrete to abstract ideas. Words or phrases are used in a non-literal way for particular effect, for example simile, metaphor, personification. Figurative language may also use elements of other senses, as in hearing with onomatopoeia, or in combination as in synaesthesia.

What your child needs to do

Your child will watch a video of a lesson about simile. The teacher will guide your child as they learn how to identify, explain and create examples of simile. Throughout the lesson, your child will be asked to pause the video to complete an activity on the activity sheets.

By the end of the lesson, your child will have activities to support them to be able to:

  • identify similes in different texts
  • analyse the impact of similes.

What your child can do next

Your child will be completing a range of activities, including:

  • revising what a simile is
  • finding examples of simile in texts and making annotations
  • exploring the impact of including and removing a simile
  • exploring why an author might use a simile.

Options for your child

Activity too hard?

Work with your child to read texts suited to their level and look for “like”, “as...as” and “as if” to help them. Remind your child that using “like” in a sentence may not be comparing two things, for example, I like chocolate. Work with your child to focus on what is being compared in the simile.

Activity too easy?

Your child may research some more sophisticated simile poetry. They can highlight which two things are being compared using annotations.

Extension/Additional activity

Have your child teach someone or demonstrate how adding or removing a simile can impact a text.

Activity sheet 1: What is and isn’t a simile?

Your task:

Read the following text extracts and complete the following tasks:

  • highlight the examples of simile
  • write what two things are being compared

Example 1:

“...He fell back into the water with a cold crash. A cloud of bubbles swirled around him, clinging to his skin like pearls. Then he cleared his snorkel –phhht! – and rolled over to look down on the world underwater. Great, round boulders and dark cracks loomed below. Thin silver fish hung in nervous schools. Seaweed trembled in the gentle current. Orange starfish and yellow plates of coral glowed from the deepest slopes where his mother was already gliding like a bird.”

Blueback by Tim Winton, 2008 Penguin

Example 2:

Twinkle, twinkle little star,

How I wonder what you are

Up above the world so high,

Like a diamond in the sky.

Example 3:

Slogans from companies:

  • Doritos: Tastes like Awesome Feels
  • Honda: The Honda’s ride is as smooth as a gazelle in the Sahara. Its comfort is like a hug from mum.

Example 4:

“Her father had inherited that temper; and at times, like antelope fleeing before the fire on the slope, his people fled from his red rages.”

Riders of the Purple Sage, by Zane Grey

Example 5:

“. . . she tried to get rid of the kitten which had scrambled up her back and stuck like a burr just out of reach.”

Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott

Activity sheet 2: Impact of similes

Your task:

Read the following text extracts and complete the following tasks:

  • Complete the remaining boxes with the impact of adding a simile.
  • Complete your own using one of the examples of simile.
  • Challenge: complete more than one; you might use your own example.

No simile

All at once, a memory shot into Mr Erasmus’s mind.

With simile

All at once, as fast as the airborne golf ball, a memory shot into Mr Erasmus’s mind.

What is the impact?

No simile

Sylphie grinned and then darted out from under the branches and into the garden, where she scooped something up from the grass.

With simile

Sylphie grinned and then darted, like a flash of mercurial lightning, out from under the branches and into the garden, where she scooped something up from the grass.

What is the impact?

No simile

They both watched as another golf ball shot across the garden.

With simile

They both watched as another golf ball, airborne like a missile, shot across the garden.

What is the impact?

  • Why do you think the author chose to use similes in this text?
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