Package 1-2: Personification – Part 2

In this package your child will watch a video of a lesson about personification. The teacher will guide your child as they learn how to identify, explain and create examples of personification.

Week 2 - Package 2 - Year 5 & 6 English - Personification - Part 2

Things your child will need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task

Ideal Back up

Personification part 2 video

Personification Part 2 PowerPoint presentation -printed

Activity sheet 1

Activity sheet 2

Paper

Pencil or pen


Highlighter

(underline or coloured pencil)

Before your child starts

This lesson is the second of three lessons about the literary device personification.

What are literary devices?
Literary devices are used in texts to connect with the reader and convey meaning. As your child reads they are beginning to recognise simple literary devices used by authors. Your child is also beginning to learn how to explain why the author has used the device. In narratives or stories, authors might use literary devices such as personification, similes, alliteration, onomatopoeia and imagery to engage the reader and allow them to visualise the setting and characters.

What is personification?

Personification is attributing or giving human characteristics to abstractions such as love, things (for example: trees sighed and moaned in the wind) or animals (for example: the hen said to the fox ...).

Personification is used by authors to engage the reader with their imagery.

What your child needs to do

Your child will watch a video of a lesson about personification. The teacher will guide your child as they learn how to identify, explain and create examples of personification.

Throughout the lesson, your child will be asked to pause the video to complete an activity on the activity sheets.

By the end of the lesson, your child will have activities to support them to be able to:

  • Identify personification in texts

  • Consider why authors use personification.

What your child can do next

Your child will be analysing texts to locate personification.

Options for your child

Activity too hard? Activity too easy?

Have your child use one paragraph from the novel extract.

Your child might find some examples in novels or online poetry and discuss.

Extension/Additional activity

Your child might create more examples using everyday objects in the house.

Activity sheet 1: Finding personification in poetry

Your task:

Read the following poetry extract and complete the following tasks:

  • 󠇄Highlight the noun being personified
  • 󠇄Highlight in a different colour the human characteristics the author uses
  • Think about why the author might have used personification in this poem?

The Walrus and the Carpenter

By Lewis Carroll

"The sun was shining on the sea,

Shining with all his might:

He did his very best to make

The billows smooth and bright —

And this was odd, because it was

The middle of the night.

The moon was shining sulkily,

Because she thought the sun

Had got no business to be there

After the day was done —

"It's very rude of him," she said,

"To come and spoil the fun."

Why do you think the author used personification in this poem?

Activity sheet 2: Finding personification in a novel extract

Your task:

Read the following poetry extract and complete the following tasks:

  • 󠇄 Highlight the noun being personified
  • 󠇄 Highlight in a different colour the human characteristics the author uses
  • 󠇄 Think about why the author might have used personification in this poem.

Blueback

by Tim Winton, 2008

Reluctantly he stuck the snorkel back in his mouth and put his head under. Near the bottom, in the mist left from their abalone gathering, a high blue shadow twitched and quivered. There it was, not a shark, but the biggest fish he had ever seen. It was gigantic. It had fins like ping-pong paddles. Its tail was a blue-green rudder. It looked as big as a horse.

‘Come down,’ said his mother. ‘Let’s look at him.’

‘I-I thought it was a shark.’

‘He sure took you by surprise,’ she said laughing. ‘That’s a blue groper. Biggest I’ve ever seen.’

Abel and his mother slid down into the deep again and saw the fish hovering then turning, eyeing them cautiously as he came. It twitched a little and edged along in front of them to keep its distance. The big gills fanned. All its armoured scales rippled in lines of green and black blending into the dizziest blue. The groper moved without the slightest effort. It was magnificent; the most beautiful thing Abel had ever seen.

After a few moments his mother eased forward with an abalone in one outstretched hand. The groper watched her. It turned away for a moment, and then came round in a circle. Abel couldn’t hold his breath much longer but he didn’t want to miss anything so he hung there above his mother and the fish with his lungs nearly bursting.

The groper arched back. The mosaic of its scales shone in the morning sun. His mother got close enough to touch the fish with the meat of the abalone. The fish trembled din the water and then froze for a moment as though getting ready to flee. She ran the shellmeat along its fat bottom lip and let go. The fish powered forward, chomped the abalone and hurtled off into a dark, deep hole.

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