Package 4-4: Vocabulary - You Can Have Mine - Part 4

This lesson is the fourth in a series of five lessons based on the text You Can Have Mine by Alison McLennan and illustrated by Cheryl Orsini. The teacher will guide your child as they learn some new vocabulary from the text.

Things your child will need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task.

Ideal

Back up

Before your child starts

This lesson is the fourth in a series of five lessons based on the text You Can Have Mine by Alison McLennan and illustrated by Cheryl Orsini.

This story is an example of a fable. A fable is a type of story that usually includes animals and that is designed to teach a lesson or a moral.

What your child needs to do

Your child will watch Vocabulary - You Can Have Mine - Part 4 video. The teacher will guide your child as they learn some new vocabulary from the text.

Throughout the lesson, your child will be asked to pause the Vocabulary - You Can Have Mine - Part 4 video to complete an activity on the activity sheets for the lesson.

By the end of the lesson, your child will have activities to support them to be able to:

  • read a text with accuracy and use appropriate expression
  • explain the feelings and wants of the characters
  • reflect on how my understanding of a text has changed
  • explain the meaning of and use a new word from the text.

What your child can do next

Your child will watch the video and pause throughout to complete the following activities:

  • Activity sheet 8: Investigating vocabulary
  • Activity sheet 9: Final fluency self-assessment

Options for your child

Activity too hard?

Have your child complete the word investigation for the word forlornly using the information presented by the teacher in the lesson.

Activity too easy?

Have your child explore other words from the story using the investigating vocabulary model. Some words to choose include: awe, glisten, sleek, elegant and ecstatic.

Extension/additional activity

How can you use the words we learnt today in your everyday conversations? Challenge your child to use adverbs like forlornly, greedily, desperately and merrily in everyday conversations.

Activity sheet 8: Investigating vocabulary

Instructions

  1. Use the word forlornly or forlorn to complete the vocabulary investigation for the following.
  1. Definition in your own words
  2. Synonyms and antonyms
  3. Example sentence
  4. Non-example sentence

Challenge: Complete the investigation using other words from the story such as grateful or elegant.

Activity sheet 9: Fluency self-assessment

Instructions

Use the categories below to complete your final fluency self-assessment.

Expression- think about your volume and tone.

  • I didn’t read with expression.
  • I read with a little bit of expression.
  • I read with too much expression.
  • I read with just the right amount of expression that showed I understood what was happening in the story.

Automatic word recognition- read effortlessly and at a good pace.

  • My pace was too slow and I wasn’t reading the words automatically.
  • My pace was too fast and my reading didn’t sound conversational.
  • I read the words automatically and at the right pace so that others could follow the story easily.

Rhythm and phrasing- pay attention to the punctuation and use a natural rhythm.

  • My reading was too choppy.
  • My reading was in awkward word chunks.
  • I read with no breaks so it sounded unnatural.
  • I read with rhythm and paid attention to the punctuation and the natural phrases.

Smoothness- sound smooth and fix any mistakes.

  • I struggled with a lot of words so my reading didn’t sound smooth.
  • I knew most of the words but not all.
  • I knew most of the words and fixed any mistakes so my reading sounded smooth.

Adapted from The Megabook of Fluency by Tim Rasinski and Melissa Cheesman Smith.

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