Package 4-1: Fluency - You Can Have Mine - Part 1

This lesson is the first in a series of five lessons based on the text You Can Have Mine by Alison McLennan and illustrated by Cheryl Orsini. The teacher will guide your child as they learn about the importance of reading fluently.

Things your child will need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task.

Ideal

Back up

Before your child starts

This lesson is the first in a series of five lessons based on the text You Can Have Mine by Alison McLennan and illustrated by Cheryl Orsini.

This story is an example of a fable. A fable is a type of story that usually includes animals and that is designed to teach a lesson or a moral.

What your child needs to do

Your child will watch Fluency - You Can Have Mine - Part 1 video of a lesson about the text You Can Have Mine. The teacher will guide your child as they learn about the importance of reading fluently. Fluency involves reading with expression, automatic word recognition, rhythm and phrasing and smoothness.

Throughout the lesson, your child will be asked to pause the video to complete an activity on the activity sheets for the lesson.

By the end of the lesson, your child will have completed activities to support them to be able to:

  • self-assess their reading fluency
  • reflect on how their understanding of a text.

What your child can do next

Your child will watch the video and pause throughout to complete the following activities:

  • Activity sheet 1: First impression
  • Activity sheet 2: You Can Have Mine
  • Activity sheet 3: Fluency self-assessment

Options for your child

Activity too hard?

Have your child focus on fluency by listening to the reading of the story multiple times. Have your child choose a section of the story to practise reading and praise your child’s

growing fluency.

Activity too easy?

Investigate other stories that are fables such as The lion and the mouse or The tortoise and the hare. What characteristics does a fable usually have? Compare and contrast the story You Can Have Mine with another fable.

Extension/additional activity

There are lots of stories that use animals as the main characters. Read some more stories that have animal characters.

Activity sheet 1: First impression

Instructions

Write a sentence to explain your first impression of the story. You might include information about the characters, the author’s purpose or message and whether you enjoyed the story and why or why not.

Challenge: Explain what you already know about the characters in the story and give evidence from the text to support your thoughts.

Activity sheet 2: You Can Have Mine

Instructions

Record yourself reading the story, or a section of the story, You Can Have Mine by Alison McLeannan.

You Can Have Mine

story by Alison McLennan, illustrated by Cheryl Orsini

When Hazel was born, the universe gave her a rainbow coat.

Most caterpillars wriggled into the world in shades of beige, green or black. Some were white or had one or two colours. But Hazel was every colour of the rainbow.

Because she was different, the other caterpillars stayed away. Perhaps they were jealous of her, or a little in awe. Either way, this meant Hazel was lonely. She would have given anything to have friends.

She wriggled the world alone until one day she crossed paths with a toad. The toad was crying softly on a lily pad when Hazel asked him what was wrong.

‘Oh, hello,’ said the toad. ‘I’m just sad because I’m so ugly and disgusting.’’

Hazel felt confused. She thought the toad was beautiful.

‘Well that’s silly,’ said Hazel. ‘I don’t think you’re ugly at all.’

The toad blinked. ‘Oh, but I am,’ he said. ‘All my cousins are green and shiny like emeralds, but I’m grey and dull like a piece of coal. I’d give anything to be green.’

Hazel wriggled closer to the toad and said, ‘Don’t be sad. You can have mine.’ And she gave the toad all her green. The toad was so gleeful and grateful! He leapt high in the air, called out ‘Thank you caterpillar!’ and landed in the pond with an almighty SPLASH.

Hazel was happy she’d been able to help the toad. She wriggled the world alone once more until she crossed paths with a cockroach. The cockroach was staring forlornly at the ground, rubbing its legs together, when Hazel asked him what was wrong.

‘Oh, hi,’ said the cockroach. ‘I’m just feeling low because I’m so plain and ordinary.’

Hazel felt confused. She thought the cockroach looked really interesting.

‘Well that’s silly,’ said Hazel. ‘I don’t think you’re plain at all.’

The cockroach looked up. ‘Oh but I am,’ he said. ‘All my cousins are bright shiny beetles who glisten in the sun, but I’m just brown. I’d give anything to be red.’

Hazel wriggled closer to the cockroach and said, ‘Don’t be sad. You can have mine.’ And she gave the cockroach all her red. The cockroach was so thrilled and thankful! He cried, ‘Thank you, caterpillar!’ as he scuttled away.

Hazel was happy she’d been able to help the cockroach. She wriggled the world alone once more until she crossed paths with a crow. The crow was covering her eyes with her wings and singing a sad little song, when Hazel asked her what was wrong.

‘Oh no,’ said the crow. ‘I didn’t want anyone to see me because I’m so dull and drab.’

Hazel felt confused. She thought the crow looked sleek and elegant.

‘Well that’s silly,’ said Hazel. ‘I don’t think you’re dull at all.’

The crow uncovered her face. ‘Oh but I am,’ she said. ‘All my cousins are covered in fluorescent feathers that look like the sunset, but I’m invisible. I’d give anything to be covered in colours.’

Hazel wriggled closer to the crow and said, ‘Don’t be sad. You can have mine.’ And she gave the crow all the colours she had left. The crow was so excited and ecstatic! She swooped up into the air, singing ‘Thank you, caterpillar!’ as she flew away on the wind.

Hazel was happy she’d been able to help the crow, but with all her colours gone, she felt so cold and exposed. She wriggled onto a low hanging branch and started to cry. The toad, who had hopped back to find her, felt the plop plop plop of her tears on his head. The cockroach, who had scurried back to find her, saw her clinging sadly to her branch.

The crow, who had flown back to find her, could feel Hazel shivering as she landed next to her. Before they could even ask her what was wrong, Hazel curled and swirled suddenly, wrapping herself in a thick silken blanket of snowy white, where she stayed in silence and stillness.

‘It’s my fault,’ said the toad. ‘She gave all her green to me.’

‘No, I think it’s my fault,’ said the cockroach. ‘She gave all her red to me.’

‘No. It’s my fault,’ said the crow.’ She gave all her colours to me, and now she has no colour at all.’

One by one they took their colours and laid them over Hazel like a patchwork quilt. Then they waited and hoped she would wake up.

While she slept, the universe gave Hazel a brand- new coat. When she emerged from under her blankets, her caterpillar-self had disappeared and in its place was the most magnificent butterfly her new friends had ever seen. Hazel’s wings were every colour of the rainbow and she was more beautiful than before. She thanked her friends for staying with her. She felt sure she would never be lonely again.

Image and text acknowledgement: The School Magazine

Activity sheet 3: Fluency self-assessment

Instructions

Use the categories below to complete your final fluency self-assessment.

Expression- think about your volume and tone.

  • I didn’t read with expression.
  • I read with a little bit of expression.
  • I read with too much expression.
  • I read with just the right amount of expression that showed I understood what was happening in the story.

Automatic word recognition- read effortlessly and at a good pace.

  • My pace was too slow and I wasn’t reading the words automatically.
  • My pace was too fast and my reading didn’t sound conversational.
  • I read the words automatically and at the right pace so that others could follow the story easily.

Rhythm and phrasing- pay attention to the punctuation and use a natural rhythm.

  • My reading was too choppy.
  • My reading was in awkward word chunks.
  • I read with no breaks so it sounded unnatural.
  • I read with rhythm and paid attention to the punctuation and the natural phrases.

Smoothness- sound smooth and fix any mistakes.

  • I struggled with a lot of words so my reading didn’t sound smooth.
  • I knew most of the words but not all.
  • I knew most of the words and fixed any mistakes so my reading sounded smooth.

Adapted from The Megabook of Fluency by Tim Rasinski and Melissa Cheesman Smith.

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