Package 3-2: Finding similes in texts

This lesson is the second of three which teaches children how to find similes within texts.

Things your child will need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task.

Ideal

Back up

Before your child starts

This lesson is the second of three which aims to build student understanding of literary devices with a particular focus on similes.

Literary devices

Literary devices are used in texts to connect with the reader and convey meaning. As your child reads they may be beginning to recognise literary devices used by authors. Your child may now be beginning to learn how to explain why the author has used the device. In narratives or stories, authors might use literary devices such as personification, similes, alliteration, onomatopoeia and imagery to engage the reader and allow them to visualise the setting and characters.

Figurative language

Figurative language creates comparisons by linking the senses and concrete to abstract ideas. Words or phrases are used in a non-literal way for particular effect, for example simile, metaphor, personification. Figurative language may also use elements of other senses, as in hearing with onomatopoeia (crack! pop!).

What is a simile?

A simile is a figure of speech that compares two usually dissimilar things. The comparison starts with like, as, or as if. For example, ‘as soft as silk’ and ‘he ran like the wind’.

What your child needs to do

Your child will watch the Finding similes in text video lesson. The teacher will guide your child as they learn how to identify, explain and create examples of simile.

Throughout the lesson, your child will be asked to pause the video to complete an activity on the activity sheets.

By the end of the lesson, your child will have activities to support them to be able to:

  • understand what a simile is.​
  • find similes in texts.​
  • identify which two things are being compared.​
  • see why an author uses simile.​

What your child can do next

Your child will be completing a range of activities, including:

  • review what a simile is.
  • find examples in texts.
  • identify the two things being compared.
  • explain why an author might have used the simile.

Once this lesson has been completed, your child will be able to complete Learning Package 3 found on the website.

Options for your child

Activity too hard?

Highlight the words “as...as” or “like” to guide their hunt for similes. When confident, your child can continue the hunt themselves. Encourage your child to look for examples in texts they are familiar with.

Activity too easy?

Have your child explore poetry or novels for examples of simile. Encourage your child to explain what impact the simile has by substituting it for a simple sentence.

Extension/Additional activity

Your child might create a short script where the characters must use a simile when talking.

Activity sheet 1: Finding similes

Your task

Highlight or underline any similes you find.

Circle the two things being compared.

Find whether the author has used “as...as” or “like”.

Example 1

Floating freely

Her wings spread apart-

As quick as a flash

She dives straight like a dart!

Example 2

Jack knew that the tide was coming in, he knew he would have to move quickly. The sand gave way beneath his feet as he marched like an army approaching.

Example 3

Feeling excited, the emerald-green hummingbird took to the sky. She darted this way and that; she was as brave as the most fearless of lions.

Example 4

It wouldn’t be long now. The doctor’s surgery had a queue a mile long – like a never ending piece of string. He sat nervously, waiting for his name to be called. His mother was as calm as the smooth water that he had been so looking forward to swimming in. He sat with his wrist that was as limp as a rotten banana – he hoped it wasn’t broken!

Activity sheet 2: Looking into similes

Your task

Complete the missing elements in the examples below.

Example 1

Without simile:

The clouds looked soft

With simile:

The clouds looked as soft as the feathers of a baby bird.

What is being compared?

Clouds and feathers

Why do you think the author used the simile?

To add more detail and help the reader visualise the idea. The feathers on a baby bird are very soft so I can visualise this and compare with a cloud.

Example 2

Without simile:

The bamboo kite flew in the air.

With simile:

The bamboo kite flew like a bird into the cool air.

What is being compared?

Why do you think the author used the simile?

Example 3

Without simile:

The book was loved.

With simile:

The book was as loved as a hug from my family and friends.

What is being compared?

Why do you think the author used the simile?

Example 4

Without simile:

Her hair was shiny.

With simile:

Her shone like the reflection of the moon on the waves.

What is being compared?

Why do you think the author used the simile?

Example 5

Try to think of your own examples.


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