Package 2-4: Poetry – Part 2

In this package your child will watch another video of a lesson about a poem called 'The Muttaburrasaurus'. Throughout the video they will complete activities about imagery, explaining the main idea of the poem and composing a personal response.

Things your child will need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task.

Ideal

Back up

Before your child starts

This lesson focuses on reading and thinking about the imagery and main ideas within a poem called The Muttaburrasaurus by Colin Varney and illustrated by Peter Sheehan.

Poetry is a way of expressing feelings, ideas and telling stories. Poems can be written in lots of ways with many different structures.

What your child needs to do

Your child should watch The Muttaburrasaurus Chorus Part 2 video. The teacher in the video will guide your child as they learn how to identify some of the imagery in the poem and the main ideas of the poem.

Throughout the lesson, your child will be asked to pause the video to complete an activity on the activity sheets for the lesson.

By the end of the lesson, your child will have activities to support them to be able to explain the main idea of the poem.

What your child can do next

Your child will watch the video and pause throughout to complete the following activities:

  • Activity 5: Imagery
  • Activity 6: Main idea
  • Activity 7: Personal response

Options for your child

Activity too hard?

Your child might write about or orally record thoughts about the main idea of the first two stanzas rather than the whole poem.

Activity too easy?

Have your child write a humorous poem about a unique pet that they would like to own.

Extension/Additional activity

What unusual or unique pet would your child like to own? Have your child write a persuasive letter explaining what pet they would like to own and how they would look after it.

Activity sheet 5: Imagery

Imagery is used by the writer to get the reader to connect to his or her piece. By getting the reader to think about the poem using their senses (sight, smell, taste, touch, and feel), there is a deeper connection to the poem. Imagery makes the reader feel like they are actually in the poem.

Instructions

  1. Read the stanza from the poem which is written below.
  2. Highlight the words that help you use your senses to imagine what is going on.
  3. Draw a for each line of the stanza.

Challenge

Explain how the poet helped you use your senses to understand what was happening in the stanza.

Excerpt from The Muttaburrasaurus

by Colin Varney and illustrated by Peter Sheehan. Used with permission from The School Magazine.

“When I take her for a walk she sniffs at trees and foyers.

When she sleeps at night she is the loudest of the snorers.

When she cleans herself she is particular and thorough.

She’s a neat and tidy dinosaur that hails from Muttaburra.”

Activity 6: Main idea

Instructions

  1. Read each stanza of the poem.
  2. Highlight the important words that help you know the main idea of the stanza.
  3. Write one sentence at the end of each stanza to summarise the main idea.

The Muttaburrasaurus

by Colin Varney and illustrated by Peter Sheehan. Used with permission from The School Magazine.

My family has a pet and she really does adore us,

You’d know that we were happy if you ever ever saw us.

She is not a kangaroo, a platypus or a walrus.

She’s a prehistoric creature called a muttaburrasaurus.

  • Write the main idea of this stanza below:

When she starts to growl you know she’s really rather raucous.

In the middle of the night, the neighbours quite abhor us.

Mr Smith next door says he’ll have to call his lawyers.

So try to keep it quiet, noisy muttaburrasaurus.

  • Write the main idea of this stanza below:

Her skin is brown and very tough and not the least bit porous

Her feet are large and spiky, but she never tries to claw us.

Her tail is large and swishy, but she never tries to floor us.

She won a cup at obedience school, our muttaburrasaurus.

  • Write the main idea of this stanza below:

People say, ‘I’ll guess its name, I bet that it’s called Horace,

Or Rex, or is it Rover? Or do you call it Morris?’

‘No,’ I say, ‘you are quite wrong. My pet’s name is Dolores.

You see, he’s a she—a female muttaburrasaurus.

  • Write the main idea of this stanza below:

When I take her for a walk she sniffs at trees and foyers.

When she sleeps at night she is the loudest of the snorers.

When she cleans herself she is particular and thorough.

She’s a neat and tidy dinosaur that hails from Muttaburra.

  • Write the main idea of this stanza below:

She played a game of footy. She was one of the best scorers.

A fortune teller said she had the shiniest of auras.

She was born in early May—hey, that makes her a Taurus.

She must be pretty old by now, that muttaburrasaurus.

  • Write the main idea of this stanza below:

An artist from the college said she’d really like to draw us.

We stood as still as statues, with smiles large and joyous.

We stayed stock-still for hours, till it began to bore us.

Then the canvas wasn’t big enough, poor muttaburrasaurus.

  • Write the main idea of this stanza below:

My song is finished, nearly done, I hope you found it glorious.

We’re at the end, there is no more, although you may implore us.

Around about three hundred words: eight verses, not one chorus,

About a large and friendly pet, my muttaburrasaurus.

  • Write the main idea of this stanza below:

Activity 7: Personal response

Instructions

Write a paragraph about your personal response to the poem. You could include details about what you liked or disliked from the poem. You could also talk about whether you made a personal connection to the poem and why.

Challenge

Write about something or someone you have a special connection with. This might be a pet or a friend.

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