Package 1-3: Onomatopoeia – Part 3

This lesson is the third in a series of three lessons about the literary device onomatopoeia. The teacher will guide your child as they learn how to use onomatopoeia in a text.

Things you need

Have these things available so your child can complete this task

Ideal Back up

Device to watch the lesson video

Printed version of the PowerPoint presentation

Onomatopoeia lesson video- Part 3

Onomatopoeia Part 3 PowerPoint - printed

Onomatopoeia student activity 4

Paper

Onomatopoeia student activity 5

Paper

Pencil or pen

Before you start

This lesson is the third in a series of three lessons about the literary device onomatopoeia.

What are literary devices?

Literary devices are used in texts to connect with the reader and convey meaning. As your child reads they are beginning to recognise simple literary devices used by authors. Your child is also beginning to learn how to explain why the author has used the device. In narratives or stories, authors might use literary devices such as personification, similes, alliteration, onomatopoeia and imagery to engage the reader and allow them to visualise the setting and characters.

What is onomatopoeia?

Your child will learn that onomatopoeia is when a word imitates or mimics the sound of the object or action it refers to. Words like swoosh, plop and bam are examples of onomatopoeia. Your child will learn that authors use these words to emphasise the sounds of the object or action that is being described. Authors use onomatopoeia to enhance their text and impact what the reader thinks or feels as they read.

What your child needs to know and do

Your child will watch the Onomatopoeia Part 3 video. The teacher will guide your child as they learn how to use onomatopoeia in a text.
Throughout the lesson, your child will be asked to pause the video to complete the activities for the lesson.

By the end of the lesson, your child should be able to:

  • create a text that uses onomatopoeia to enhance the description for the reader.

What to do next

Download the next student activity for this week titled ‘Beyond the Milky Way- Part 1.’ which is available on the Learning at Home website.

Options for your child

Activity too hard? Activity too easy?

Have your child create two- or three-word phrases using onomatopoeia, for example, the balloon went splat. Work with your child to expand on their phrase to create a sentence. Have them orally record their examples of onomatopoeia.

Have your child expand on their sentence to create a paragraph or poem that uses onomatopoeia to enhance the experience of the reader.

Extension the learning

Have your child teach a family member or friend about onomatopoeia. Continue to hunt for examples of onomatopoeia in texts, conversations and digital media.

Onomatopoeia activity 4: Fireworks

Learning intention: I am learning to identify, explain and use onomatopoeia in a text.

Success criteria: I can create a text that uses onomatopoeia to enhance the description for the reader.

Instructions: Complete the Y-chart by listing words about what you might see, hear and feel if you were watching a fireworks display.

Instructions: Write a sentence about a fireworks display including examples of onomatopoeia.

Challenge: Write a paragraph by expanding on your sentence.

Onomatopoeia activity 5: Using onomatopoeia

Learning intention: I am learning to identify, explain and use onomatopoeia in a text.

Success criteria: I can create a text that uses onomatopoeia to enhance the description for the reader.

Instructions:
1. Choose an image that you would like to write about from the page below.
2. Complete the Y-chart by listing words about what you might see, hear and feel if you were in the image.
3. Use the words from your Y-chart to write a sentence about your image. Don’t forget to include examples of onomatopoeia.
4. Seek feedback about your sentence and try to improve your writing based on the feedback.

Instruction: Use the words from your Y-chart to write a sentence about your image

Challenge: Write a paragraph by expanding on your sentence.

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