Package 3 - Kindergarten Science - Liquid nitrogen show

Join the scientists from Fizzics Education to learn about all about light and sound. Watch the video and then complete some of your own light and sound experiments at home.

Week 5 - Package 3 - Kindergarten Science - Liquid nitrogen show

Things your child will need

Have these things available so that your child can complete this task.

Ideal

  • Liquid nitrogen show video

  • Toys or household items made of different materials e.g. wooden blocks, soft fabric stuffed toys, metal toy cars, rubber balls (as many different kinds of material as possible).

  • Table or floor location where all the items can be put together.

  • Paper and pen

Optional: extension activity

  • Safe kitchen items (also made of different materials e.g. metal pots, silicone trays or plastic/wooden mixing bowls)

  • Ice cubes

  • A towel or paper towel (just in case)



Before your child starts

Make sure your child has everything ready that they will need at the start of the lesson.

What your child needs to do

  1. Watch the Liquid nitrogen video.

  2. Discuss that all the things around us are made of lots of kinds of materials. Materials can be very hard and strong like concrete or they might be soft and squishy like a teddy bear. Some materials are better than others at letting heat move from one place to another. This is why they feel different when you touch them.

  3. Follow instructions on Activity sheet 1: Taking temperature (below)

  4. Discuss the results of the activity. What problems did you have (if any)? Which items were cold to touch? Which items were warm to touch? Why do you think that those things felt different even in the same room?

What your child can do next

Looking for more science? You can also try the Extension activity: Melting materials for a bit of extra fun and learning.

Options for your child

Activity too hard?

Check the temperature of some different areas around your house instead. Is there a room or place that is always warm? Find it, stand there a while and feel what it feels like. Is there a room or place that is always cold? Go and find it and see what it feels like there. How does this compare to places we know to be cold like inside the fridge? What about under the blankets on your bed? Think about what materials are in those places that are warm or cold. Are there lots of tiles and metal or lots of blankets and rugs? Where would you rather sleep?

Activity too easy?

You can also try putting a few of the items in the fridge and letting them get cold. Then, take them out and leave them for 15 minutes. Did they get warmer? Did they all get warm at the same speed or were some able to go back to room temperature quicker than others? Why do you think that might have happened?

Extension/Additional activity

  • Extension activity: Melting materials (see below)

  • Research how different materials can be mixed together to make cool new things.





Activity sheet 1: Taking temperature

We are surrounded by things made of different materials. Even though they are all at room temperature, some may feel like they are very different temperatures. Some objects feel cold to touch, some feel the same as your hands and others feel warm. Some also feel very hot (but we should never touch very hot things!).

Sort a group of objects into three groups - those that feel warm, cold or normal to touch.

Equipment

  • Toys or household items made of different materials e.g. wooden blocks, soft fabric stuffed toys, metal toy cars, rubber balls (as many different materials as possible)

  • Table or floor location where all the items can be put together.

  • Paper and pen and scissors (or 3 pieces of paper and no scissors)

Procedure

  1. Collect all your toys or household items and put them together on a table or a floor space. Leave them together for 30 minutes so they can all become the same temperature. In science we call this equilibrating.

  2. Cut your paper into 3 pieces, these are going to be labels. Draw a sun on one - this is for things that feel warm. Draw a snowman on one - this is for things that feel cold. Draw a house on the last one - this is for things that feel the same as room temperature.

  3. Place the 3 labels spaced out on the table or floor. We are going to create three groups. (Scientists love to group things. It helps us learn more about things by figuring out what’s the same and what’s different.)

  4. Carefully pick up each object and decide if it feels warm, cold or room temperature.

  5. Place it next to the label that matches how it feels.

  6. Move on to the next item and continue until all of them are sorted into your three groups.

:Discussion

  1. What do the things that feel warm have in common?

  2. What do the things that feel cold have in common?

  3. What do the things that feel like room temperature have in common?


Extension activity: Melting materials

Equipment

  • Safe kitchen items made of different materials e.g. metal pots, silicone trays or plastic/wooden mixing bowls

  • Ice cubes

  • A towel or paper towel (just in case)

Procedure

  1. Choose several ice cubes or pieces of ice that are a similar size.

  2. Place each one on a kitchen item made of a different material. Watch as they melt.

Discussion

  1. What kitchen item did the ice melt fastest on? What material was it made of?

  2. In your first experiment (Activity 1) did you have a material the same as the kitchen item that melted ice fastest? If yes, what was it? Did you group that item into the warm, cold or room temperature group? Why might that feel that way to touch and then be fast or slow at melting ice?

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