Thinking Skills

The thinking skills encompass the productive, purposeful and intentional thinking that underpin effective learning in science and technology and provide students with a framework for solving problems. Select a thinking skill to learn more about it.

Introduction

Examples in the videos link directly to syllabus content from the Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus (2017).

Unpack the components of computational thinking including decomposition, abstraction, pattern recognition and algorithms.

Computational thinking

Computational thinking:

  • is a process where a problem is analysed and solved so that a human, machine or computer can effectively implement the solution
  • involves using strategies to organise data logically, break down problems into parts, interpret patterns and design and implement algorithms to solve problems.

The computational thinking video (5:13) below explains computational thinking using the NSW Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus. Examples from Early Stage 1, Stage 2 and Stage 3 show how computational thinking could be embedded in the classroom.

Transcript of 'Computational thinking'

Definition © 2017 NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales.

Design thinking is a process where a need or opportunity is identified and a design solution is developed.

Design thinking

The consideration of economic, environmental and social impacts that result from design solutions are core to design thinking.

Design thinking:

  • methods can be used when trying to understand a problem, generate ideas and refine a design based on evaluation and testing
  • is intrinsically linked to the skills of design and production.

The design thinking video (6:27) explains design thinking using the NSW Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus. It includes a real-world example of design thinking from Stage 2 following the empathise, define, ideate, prototype and test model.

Transcript of 'Design thinking'

Definition © 2017 NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales

An in-depth exploration of scientific thinking, fair testing and working scientifically through a student investigation.

Scientific thinking

Scientific thinking is:

  • purposeful thinking that has the objective to enhance knowledge
  • intrinsically linked to the skills of working scientifically.

A scientific thinker:

  • raises questions and problems
  • observes and gathers data
  • draws conclusions based on evidence
  • tests conclusions
  • thinks with an open mind
  • communicates research findings appropriately.

It can be helpful to conceptualise scientific thinking as the thinking that students engage in throughout the process of working scientifically.

Scientific thinking video (6:41) explains scientific thinking using the NSW Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus. A Stage 3 example shows teachers how students could use scientific thinking to solve a problem.

Transcript of 'Scientific thinking'

Definition © 2017 NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales.

An explanation of systems thinking and examples of how teachers might embed it as part of their science and technology planning.

Systems thinking

Systems thinking is an understanding of how related objects or components interact to influence how a system functions. Understanding the complexity of systems and the interdependence of components is important for scientific research and for the creation of solutions to technical, economic and social issues.

The systems thinking video (6:52) explains systems thinking using the NSW Science and Technology K-6 Syllabus. Examples from Stage 1, Stage 2 and Stage 3 show how you could embed systems thinking in the classroom.

Transcript of Systems thinking

Definition © 2017 NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales.

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