Transcript of Stage 6 Mathematics Standard course that has been moved

Mathematics moved

Speaker: Amy Birungi

Hi, everyone. This is Amy Birungi. I'm the mEsh project officer for mathematics, and in this video I'm going to go through the content for the new Stage 6 Mathematics Standard course that has been moved between years 11 and 12. So it would be really helpful as I go through this for you to have a syllabus open in front of you with a highlighter. So we're going to start with Year 11.

The first topic is MS-A1 Formulae and Equations. You'll find that on page 29 of your syllabus. I've highlighted the things that have moved from Year 12 into Year 11 in yellow throughout this document. So you can see the other things that have moved into Year 11 is that students must now review changing the subject of a linear formula when they develop and solve linear equations. They must also look at equations derived from substituting values into a formula, and finally students are required to calculate medication dosages for children and adults from packets, given age or weight using Fried's formula, Young's formula or Clark's formula as appropriate. That's obviously moved from the Focus Study into Medication.

OK, moving to MS-A2 Linear Relationships, on page 30, you'll see highlighted in yellow there that students now need to recognise that a direct variation relationship produces a straight-line graph, they need to determine that a direct variation relationship from a written description, a straight-line graph passing through the origin or a linear function in the form of y = mx. They must also recognise the gradient of a direct variation graph as the constant variation, and lastly they need to solve practical direct variation problems. In MS-M1 Applications of Measurement, which can be found on page 32, you'll see that students are now asked to calculate the percentage error of a reported measurement. And also under Perimeter, Area and Volume there, they're asked to solve problems involving the surface area of solids, including but not limited to prisms, cylinders, spheres and composites.

Remember that the phrase 'including but not limited to' means that you need to cover prism, cylinders, spheres and composite solids but not be limited to that. That is, you could include other examples. OK, looking further into MS-M1 Applications of Measurement - we're now on page 33. In Year 11, students are asked to calculate now the capacity of spheres and composite solids, and they're asked to convert between units of volume and capacity. In the topic Units of Energy and Mass, you'll see the last dot point there highlighted. Students are to use units of energy to solve problems involving the consumption of electricity - for example, kilowatt hours and investigate common appliances in terms of their energy consumption. This has obviously moved from the Focus Study into Energy that was traditionally in Year 12. OK, MS-M2 Working with Time, on page 34.

You'll see that a lot of the content here has been highlighted. That's been moved down from the Spherical Geometry topic in Year 12 and the remaining stuff is new content, which you would have found from watching the previous video. OK, MS-F1 Money Matters can be found on page 37. The new or the moved content here is that students must interpret and use information about a household's electricity, water or gas usage and related charges and costs from household bills. Going on to MS-S1 Data Analysis, on page 39. You'll see that when students are asked to classify and represent data, in Year 11, they're now doing that including back-to-back where comparing two datasets using stem and leaf plots.

So that's that display multiple datasets that traditionally was in Year 12. Looking further into that topic, Section S1.2, you'll see down the bottom there that much of the content has been highlighted, in particular to do with outliers. And then also to look at the distributions of graphical displays and using box plots to display and compare datasets. Looking at MS-S2 Relative Frequency and Probability, on page 41, you'll see that Year 11 students now have to use probability tree diagrams to solve problems involving two-stage events. OK, looking into the Year 12 Standard 1 course now. There are a couple of different colours that I've used throughout this section. There's obviously the things that have been moved up from Year 11 into Year 12, but also considering that this Standard 1 course replaced the Mathematics General 1 course - traditionally the non-ATAR course - you'll see that some content has come down from the previous General 2 course into this course.

So, in the first topic, MS-A3 Types of Relationships, on page 45, students are now asked to solve a pair of simultaneous linear equations graphically by finding the point of intersection between two straight-line graphs using digital technology. Here you'll see in blue the two dot points that have been moved up from Year 11. The sections highlighted in purple are those that have been in Year 12 previously but were only in the mathematics General 2 course. So, that is, understand the difference between compass and true bearings, and again there's a reference to true bearings at the bottom. OK, looking at MS-M4 Rates, on page 48, students in Standard 1 are asked to use, simplify and convert between units of rates. For example, kilometres per hour and metres per second, millilitres per minute and litres per hour. They're asked to work with speed as a rate, including interpreting distant time graphs, travel graphs, and use them to solve problems related to speed, distance and time. And finally they're asked to calculate the amount of fuel used on a trip given the fuel consumption rate, and compare fuel consumption statistics for various vehicles. So obviously that's a move up from the Focus Study into Mathematics and Driving from Year 11. OK, MS-M5 Scale Drawings can be found on page 49 of the syllabus, and you'll see there the things that have been moved up from Year 11.

So there's solving practical problems involving ratio, that includes map scales, mixtures for building materials or cost per item. They're asked use to the linear scale factor to two similar figures to solve problems and interpret commonly used symbols and abbreviations on building plans and elevation views. In MS-F2 Investment, which can be found on page 51 of your syllabus, students in the Standard 1 course now are asked to calculate the future value or the present value and the interest rate of a compound interest investment using the future value formula. They're asked to compare and contrast different investment strategies, performing appropriate calculations when needed and they're asked to solve practical problems involving compounding. For example, determining the impact of inflation on prices and wages or calculate the appreciated value of items, for example, antiques. There are aspects of that last dot point that are new, but the principle has formerly been found in Year 11. OK, MS-F3, which is Depreciation and Loans on page 52, students are being asked to calculate the depreciation of the asset using the declining-balance method and realise that this is the compound interest formula with a negative value for r. In MS-S3 Further Statistical Analysis, which can be found on page 54, students in Standard 1 are expected to identify the target population to be represented, as well as investigate questionnaire design principles, and there's an elaboration there of what that means.

OK, looking to Year 12 Standard 2. This is the course that replaces Mathematics General 2. Again you'll see two colours of highlighter in this section. One is for the content that has been moved up from Year 11. That is in the blue, and the dark green represents content that was previously in the Mathematics General 1 course. So looking at MS-A4 Types of relationships, on page 60, students now need to solve a pair of simultaneous linear equations graphically by finding the point of intersection between two straight-line graphs using digital technology. They're also asked to solve practical problems that involve finding the point of intersection of two straight-line graphs. For example, determining and interpreting the break-even point for a simple business problem. In MS-A4 Types of Relationships, on page 61, students are asked to graph a quadratic function using digital technology. Again, this was previously only required of students doing Mathematics General 1.

In MS-M6 Non-right-angled Trigonometry, on page 63, students are asked to review and use the trigonometric ratios to find the length of an unknown side or the size of an unknown angle in a right angle. In MS-M7 on Rates, which can be found on page 64, the points highlighted in blue is what's been moved up from Year 11. So uses rates to solve and describe practical problems, calculate the amount of fuel used on a trip and then work with ratio to express a ratio in the simplest form. The dash point coloured in green - "use rates to make comparisons" - was traditionally in the Mathematics General 1 course from their Focus Study into Health. Again, in MS-M7 Rates, now on page 65, the content that's been moved from Year 11 is that students are to obtain measurements from scale drawings, including but not limited to maps or building plans to solve problems. The two dash points coloured in green have come from the Mathematics General 1 syllabus, so interpreting commonly used symbols and abbreviations on building plans and elevation views and calculating the volume of rainfall over an area using the formula V = Ah.

In MS-F4 Investment and Loans, which can be found on page 67, moved up from Year 11 is that students now are asked to calculate the future value or present value and the interest rate of a compound interest investment using the future value formula. They're asked to compare and contrast different investment strategies, performing appropriate calculations when needed, and they're asked to solve practical problems involving compounding. For example, determining the impact of inflation on prices and wages. They also need to work with shares and calculate the appreciated value of items, for example, antiques. Following on in MS-F4, now on page 68, you'll see that students are asked to calculate the depreciation of an asset using the declining-balance method. This is in some regards new. It was used in the Year 11 syllabus to relate only to cars in the Focus Study on Mathematics and Driving. Now it's being applied to other items as well.

They're also asked to solve practical problems involving reducing balance loans. For example, determining the total loan amount and monthly repayments. Again, formerly, this was related to cars and generally only using a table or online calculator. The dash point coloured in green has come from the Mathematics General 1 syllabus, where students need to identify the various fees and charges associated with credit card usage. OK, looking at MS-F5 Annuities, on page 69, students need to use a table of future value interest factors to perform annuity calculations. For example, calculating the future value of an annuity, the contribution amount required to achieve a given future value or the single sum that would produce the same future value as a given annuity.

In MS-S4, Bivariate Data Analysis, found on page 72, now in Year 12, students are asked to implement the statistical investigation process, then answer questions that involve identifying, analysing and describing associations between two numerical variables. As part of that, they're asked to construct, interpret and analyse scatterplots for bivariate numerical data in practical contexts while demonstrating awareness of issues of privacy and bias, ethics and responsiveness to diverse groups and cultures. OK, so that takes us through the whole syllabus and the content that has been moved either from Year 11 into Year 12 or Year 12 down to Year 11 or between the two Year 12 courses. Please take the time to go back if you need to, so that you can highlight the relevant sections and I'd also encourage if you haven't already to watch the recording on the new content in the syllabuses. Thanks for your time.

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