Modern Greek Continuers

NESA documents

Stage 6 Modern Greek Continuers syllabus

Assessment and reporting in Continuers Stage 6

Support materials – including past HSC papers

Advice for students

HSC examinations in Continuers language courses – advice for students (DOCX 86KB) – generic advice to support students of the Continuers course to prepare for the oral and written HSC examinations.

Text types in Continuers

What are ‘texts’ (text types)?

‘Texts’ (text types) are various forms of spoken and written language, such as articles, conversations, letters and so on. Each text type varies in its characteristics of format, style, and language. In the Modern Greek Continuers HSC written examination, the following text types are specified for production:

  1. article
  2. diary entry
  3. email
  4. letter
  5. message
  6. note
  7. notice
  8. postcard
  9. recount
  10. report
  11. script of an interview
  12. script of a speech/talk.

Note: In the oral examination, you participate in a conversation.

In the written section of the HSC examination, you are required to produce 2 different styles of writing:

  • the first style is informative or descriptive
  • the second style is reflective, persuasive or evaluative, and could require you to explain or justify a point of view.

Using the correct text type and including the correct style of content is important.

Sample tasks and practice questions

Past HSC papers can be downloaded from the NESA website.

Some past HSC questions have been used as sample tasks in this document.

For each task, identify the following:

  1. What is the purpose?
  2. Who is the audience?
  3. What is the context?
  4. What is the required text type?
  5. What is the style?

The ‘texts’ (text types)

1 – article

Purpose

  • to sustain an argument
  • to describe
  • to inform, persuade, amuse or entertain

Structure

  • titles/headings (if appropriate)
  • development of ideas/arguments
  • sequencing and linking of ideas
  • statement of conclusion or advice

Language features

  • range of tenses (past, present, future, conditional)
  • language can be descriptive, factual, judgemental, emotive or persuasive, depending on context
  • informal or formal register (be consistent throughout the article)

Sample questions

Write approximately 200 words in GREEK. Write an article for the school blog reflecting on the use of laptops throughout your school years.

2014 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 13(a) (10 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2014

Write approximately 200 words in GREEK. You have been asked to write an article for the school newsletter evaluating the importance of school uniforms. Write the article.

2017 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 13(a) (10 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2017

2 – diary entry

Purpose

  • a personal reflection on a theme, place or situation

Structure

  • date (Τετάρτη, 14 Ιουνίου 2017)
  • opening (Αγαπημένο μου ημερολόγιο,…)
  • development of ideas/arguments
  • sequencing and linking of ideas
  • concluding statement (for example Με αγάπη, Αντίο)
  • sign off with name (optional)

Language features

  • written in the first person (keep the tone/perspective of the character from whose perspective you are writing)
  • usually written in past tense (simple past, imperfect, past perfect)
  • language can be descriptive, factual, judgemental, emotive or persuasive, depending on context
  • informal register

Sample question

Answer the following question by writing approximately 75 words in GREEK. Imagine you have had a very disappointing weekend. Write a diary entry describing it.

2016 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 12 (5 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2016

3 – email

Purpose

  • to use technology-based methods of communication
  • to send greetings
  • to retell events
  • to inform
  • to seek a response

Structure

  • email conventions (you are not usually required to write an email address in the exam)
  • specific details without elaboration
  • salutation (for example, Αξιότιμε/η, Αγαπητέ Κύριε/Αγαπητή Κυρία, Αγαπητέ φίλε/Αγαπητή φίλη, Χαίρετε)
  • conclusion (for example, Με εκτίμηση, Με φιλικούς χαιρετισμούς, Με σεβασμό, Με αγάπη)

Language features

  • range of tenses (present, perfect, imperfect, conditional)
  • language can be descriptive, factual, judgemental, emotive or persuasive, depending on context
  • informal or formal register (be consistent throughout the email)

Sample question

Answer the following question by writing approximately 75 words in GREEK. Your cousin will be visiting from Greece during the summer holidays. Send him/her an email outlining what you have planned for the visit.

2017 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 12 (5 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2017

4 – letter

Purpose

  • to communicate in writing with acquaintances, friends or family
  • to inform, amuse, persuade

Structure

  • your name and address on the left side (Από/Αποστολέας) with the address to which you are writing on the right (Προς/Παραλήπτης) (formal)
  • town and date under the address to which you are writing
  • salutations (for example Αξιότιμε/η, Αγαπητέ Κύριε/Αγαπητή Κυρία, Αγαπητέ φίλε/Αγαπητή φίλη, Χαίρετε)
  • letter conventions (for example, Σας γράφουμε σχετικά με, Σας ευχαριστώ για την επιστολή σας, Θα ήθελα να σας ευχαριστήσω για τη συνεργασία, Είμαι στην ευχάριστη θέση να)
  • ending (for example, Με εκτίμηση, Με φιλικούς χαιρετισμούς, Με σεβασμό, Με αγάπη, Φιλιά)

Language features

  • range of tenses (present, perfect, imperfect, future, conditional)
  • language can be descriptive, factual, judgemental, emotive or persuasive, depending on context
  • formality of language will depend on relationship between participants (for example letter to a friend or letter to a newspaper)

Sample questions

Write approximately 200 words in GREEK. You recently arrived in Greece for a working holiday. You have found accommodation and are sharing with a colleague. Write a letter to your family reflecting on this arrangement.

2015 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 13(a) (10 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2015

Write approximately 200 words in GREEK. You are planning a trip to Greece next year with your friend. You have decided to write a letter persuading your grandparents, who live there, to let you both stay with them. Write the text of the letter.

2018 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 13(b) (10 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2018

5 – message

Purpose

  • to inform
  • to request
  • to instruct
  • to remind

Note – the difference between a message and a note is that a message can vary in type, such as voicemail message, text message, email, social media post.

Structure

  • succinct (short and to the point)
  • general statement, description, procedure
  • lack of descriptive detail
  • frequent use of colloquial language if to a close friend/family member

Language features

  • shorter than a standard letter
  • informal or formal register (be consistent throughout the message)

Sample question

Answer the following question by writing approximately 75 words in GREEK. Write a message to your careers adviser about a job interview you have recently attended.

2015 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 12 (5 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2015

6 – note

Purpose

  • to inform
  • to request
  • to instruct
  • to remind

Note – the difference between a message and a note is that a message can vary in type such as voicemail message, text message, email.

Structure

  • succinct (short and to the point)
  • general statement, description, procedure
  • lack of descriptive detail
  • frequent use of colloquial language (does not necessarily mean informal register)

Language features

  • shorter than a standard letter
  • informal or formal register (be consistent throughout the note)

Sample question

Answer the following question by writing approximately 75 words in GREEK. Your godparents have given you some money to celebrate your Name Day. Write a note to them, including a description of how you spent the money.

2018 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 12 (5 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2018

7 – notice

Purpose

  • to inform
  • to seek a response (for example looking for a pen pal or looking for a roommate to share accommodation)

Structure

  • heading/addressee
  • specific details without elaboration
  • statement of conclusion or advice (for example giving contact details)

Language features

  • often written in present tense
  • language can be descriptive, factual, emotive or persuasive depending on context
  • informal or formal register

Sample question

Answer the following question by writing approximately 75 words in GREEK. You are studying at a school in Greece and looking for a flatmate to move in to your place to share the costs. Write a note to put on the school noticeboard.

Adapted from 2018 Higher School Certificate Examination, Chinese Continuers, Section III, Question 12 (5 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2018

8 – postcard

Purpose

  • to provide information, amuse or entertain
  • to retell events and experiences (for example who, where, what, when)

Structure

  • salutations (Αγαπητέ/ή)
  • brief description or message
  • formulaic ending (Σε φιλώ, Θα τα πούμε σύντομα!)

Language features

  • descriptive language
  • personal impressions
  • present or past tense, for example what it is like, or where you went, what you did, what you saw

Sample question

Answer the following question by writing approximately 75 words in GREEK. You are a young Greek tourist newly arrived in Australia. You write a postcard to a friend giving your first impressions.

Adapted from 2011 Higher School Certificate Examination, French Continuers, Section III, Question 12 (5 marks)  © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2011

9 – recount

Purpose

  • to inform or entertain
  • to retell past events or experiences
  • to retell a series of events

Structure

  • introduction/orientation (set the scene – who, what, where, when)
  • events sequenced in chronological order
  • closing statement

Language features

  • often told in the first person (Εγώ)
  • descriptive language
  • often told in past tense (simple past, imperfect, past perfect)
  • time words to connect events (for example, στην αρχή, στη συνέχεια, ύστερα, αργότερα, τώρα, πριν, στο τέλος)
  • words which tell us when, where, with whom and how
  • linking words (for example, διότι, επειδή, επιπλέον, ωστόσο, με άλλα λόγια, επομένως, συμπερασματικά)

Sample question

Write approximately 200 words in GREEK. Write a recount for your school blog reflecting on a special family celebration.

Adapted from 2013 Higher School Certificate Examination, Korean Continuers, Section III, Question 13(a) (10 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2013

10 – report

Purpose

  • to present information about a class of things (to classify) OR
  • to describe the way things are
  • to organise facts
  • to draw conclusions

Structure

  • general statement or classification
  • series of paragraphs that describes
  • logical progression
  • concluding statement or summary

Language features

  • factual with supporting evidence, such as statistics, examples
  • objective language
  • linking words (for example, διότι, επειδή, επιπλέον, ωστόσο, με άλλα λόγια, επομένως, συμπερασματικά)

Sample question

Write approximately 200 words in GREEK. You recently completed a month of work experience. Write a report for the school newsletter evaluating whether the experience was beneficial.

Adapted from 2017 Higher School Certificate Examination, German Continuers, Section III, Question 12(b) (10 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2017

11 – script of an interview

Purpose

  • to find out information (for example a story or a response)
  • to communicate ideas, opinions and attitudes
  • to draw conclusions

Structure

  • salutations
  • clear idea of the purpose of the interview (Θα ήθελα να μιλήσω για...)
  • question and response sequence
  • use of filler expressions (Στην πραγματικότητα, Είναι γνωστό ότι, Είμαι της γνώμης)
  • conclusion (for example, Σας ευχαριστώ για το χρόνο σας!)

Language features

  • question forms (by the interviewer)
  • register – use polite language (for example, Εσείς)
  • phrases to delve deeper (for example, Τι σκέφτεστε για...)
  • transition strategies when switching topics (Ας περάσουμε στο επόμενο θέμα)

Sample question

Write approximately 200 words in GREEK. You have interviewed a youth group leader for your local newspaper. Write the script of the interview in which the leader reflects on the experience of working with young people.

Adapted from 2015 Higher School Certificate Examination, Spanish Continuers, Section III, Question 13(a) (10 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2015

12 – script of a speech/talk

Purpose

  • to communicate ideas, opinions and attitudes
  • to entertain
  • to persuade
  • to welcome
  • to thank

Structure

  • salutations (for example, Αγαπητοί Κύριοι/Αγαπητές Κυρίες, Αγαπητοί φίλοι/Αγαπητές φίλες)
  • introductory statement of purpose (Σήμερα θα σας μιλήσω, Το θέμα της ομιλίας μου είναι)
  • ideas and information organised and linked
  • concluding remarks (Κλείνοντας, Ευχαριστώ θερμά για την προσοχή σας, Ευχαριστώ που με ακούσατε)

Language features

  • choice of expressions to engage the audience
  • descriptive words
  • range of tenses
  • usually subjective language (this depends on the context)

Sample question

Write approximately 200 words in GREEK. You are to deliver a speech at the birthday celebration of someone special to you. Write the script of the speech in which you reflect on the impact he/she has had on your life.

2016 Higher School Certificate Examination, Modern Greek Continuers, Section III, Question 13(a) (10 marks) © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2016

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