Visual design resources

KASCA (knowledge and skills creative arts) visual design framework

The KASCA visual design framework breaks down the core components of practice, conceptual framework and the frames into a series of lesson sequences. All lesson sequences come with ready-to-use differentiated learning and teaching resources and are available in an online format through the tabs below and an e-book (PDF 5.02 MB) that can be downloaded to your smart device.

Duration: 1-2 weeks

Driving question

Are fonts the clothing of typography?

Overview

Through the contexts of designer - design - world - audience, students explore a range of graphic media practices. Students will reflect on contemporary graphic design and the role of the designer across other disciplines and communities. Through critical and historical enquiry and studio practice, students will experiment and develop skills in image and text for print and screen. Using analogue and digital technologies such as, drawing, illustration, 3D construction and digital manipulations, students will develop a portfolio of graphic designs that include, typographic experiments, book design and public visual communications.

Sequences 1 - 8 form an introduction to graphic design focusing on the components of typography, image and layout. Students use their design journals to record, plan and experiment with the learnt class material. An online blog will be used to share and personalise their type journey. A publication of all the collated students practical outcomes in part 10, will form a cohesive published design object for exhibition and assessment.

Stage 5 outcomes

A student:

5.6 selects appropriate procedures and techniques to make and refine visual design artworks

5.7 applies their understanding of aspects of practice to critically and historically interpret visual design artworks

5.8 uses their understanding of the function of and relationships between artist – artwork –world – audience in critical and historical interpretations of visual design artworks

5.10 constructs different critical and historical accounts of visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Content

This sequence explores the anatomy of typography and the conventions that make letters legible and unique. Students will analyse letterforms through the design principles of line, shape and colour with the conceptual agencies of design and the design world.

Focus areas
  • Shape and letterform
  • Structural and historical frames
  • Designer and the design world.

Cross-curriculum content and key competencies

Information and communication technology

Difference and diversity

Numeracy

Literacy

Assessment

All activities require students to demonstrate their learning and are all assessment for learning activities.

Teaching and learning activities

Introduction

Students will:

  1. search the internet for an image of a five year old child’s handwriting of their name
  2. copy the image into their online blog, referencing where the image came from appropriately
  3. write a reflection in their blog entry of any memories they had when first learning to write their own name. If they are unable to remember learning to write, students can imagine and write a list on what steps they would need to take to teach a five year old student how to write
  4. in groups, share the image of the name, and discuss any letters that may be backward or badly formed
  5. research and write in their blogs definitions for terms ‘legibility’ and ‘readability’. Discuss this terminology as a class.

Watch the following videos as a class

Students will:

  • define the difference between a font and a typeface in their blogs
  • discuss the difference as a class
  • start a glossary section in their online blog and give graphic examples on each new term they learn
  • investigate the types of fonts available in programs such as
    • Microsoft word
    • Adobe Illustrator
    • Adobe Photoshop
    • Indesign
  • screenshot and paste their 10 favourite font types into their online blog with the name of the font as the text
  • assign an adverb to each font type. An example of this could be
    • Bernard MT – crowded
    • Bradley hand – flowing
    • Helvetica – structured.
  • research the internet for examples of old style, new style, modern and decorative type. Provide examples with definitions in their blogs
  • visit online type foundry sites such as Linotype
  • discuss the process a designer might use when designing a front
  • reflect in their blogs an answer to the question:
    • ‘How do fonts enhance the work of a graphic designer?’

Technical skills

Materials required
  • ruled graph paper
  • tracing paper
  • visual design journal/blog.

Students will:

  • read the Anatomy of Type handout (PDF 3.93MB)
  • discuss the individual characteristics of the 26 letters that make up the alphabet
  • discuss the characteristics that make up each of the 26 letters of the alphabet. The characteristics are shown in the Anatomy of Typography image (shown below) such as the stem, bowl, shoulder, bar and so on
  • copy and enlarge three letters by drawing upper and lower case using the graph paper.

When sharing the results as a class, discuss the letters that have distinct features and characteristics, for example Xx Bb and Gg.

Using the Jasper Johns drawings and an A3 sheet of paper, students will:

  • select a new style or modern font they liked from the internet
  • draw and overlay all letters of the alphabet similar to the drawing and painting of Jasper Johns (shown below)
  • repeat with numbers 0-9 using a different font.
Communicate

Students will complete a digital blog/visual design journal documenting the ideas and processes used throughout this sequence. This can be completed through one-note, Class Notebook or Google classroom.

The blog/visual design journal should contain:

  • the process and technical skills used in practical classes
  • personal reflections about the practical activities
  • information gained through investigations or class discussions
  • answers to questions asked in class
  • a glossary of new words and terminology with graphic examples
  • and thoughts of the different techniques and types explored.

Differentiation

Extension

Teachers are encouraged to provide students with acceleration activities if required.

Students could:

  • photograph examples of typography used in public spaces and reflect and discuss the artists intentions and technique in their blog
  • use the anatomy of typographic terms to analyse another students/artists work
  • write a blog post addressing the driving question.

Life skills

Life skills outcomes

LS.2 explores a variety of materials, techniques and processes

LS.3 explores the function of a variety of visual designers and audiences

LS.9 uses a range of materials, techniques and processes to make visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Students could:

  • select a font and type the first letter of their name
  • increase the size of the font and print
  • using tracing paper, copy the letter, cut it out and trace around it onto a piece of cardboard
  • cut out the shape and colour with paint
  • discuss the process with the teacher or classmates.

This exercise can be repeated include other letters of their name, if needed.

Evaluate

Formative assessment can be used to determine learning progress throughout the lesson sequences. Teachers should informally assess a student’s level of understanding and adapt accordingly.

Reference list and resources

Duration: 2 weeks

Driving question

Could we justify adding a 27th letter to the alphabet?

Overview

By examining historical conventions for the use of the ampersand, students will investigate whether it is possible to create a new 27th letter by using the rules of type anatomy.

Stage 5 outcomes

A student:

5.6 selects appropriate procedures and techniques to make and refine visual design artworks

5.7 applies their understanding of aspects of practice to critically and historically interpret visual design artworks

5.8 uses their understanding of the function of and relationships between artist – artwork –world – audience in critical and historical interpretations of visual design artworks

5.10 constructs different critical and historical accounts of visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Content

This sequence explores the historical use of special characters in typography. Students will study the contemporary use of special characters in the digital social media world, comparing it to its function in traditional print and on the qwerty keyboard. Students will then create a new graphic that functions as both a letter and a word.

Focus areas

  • Shape and letterform
  • Structural and historical frames
  • Design, design world and audience.

Cross-curriculum content and key competencies

Information and communication technology

Work, Employment and Enterprise

Numeracy

Literacy

Assessment

All activities require students to demonstrate their learning and are all assessment for learning activities.

Teaching and learning activities

Introduction

Students will:

  1. work through The 27th letter PowerPoint (PPTX 6.73MB) as a class, completing the exercises below:
    1. slide two – guess and write a definition in their blog/visual design journal of what they think the symbol is and its function
    2. slide four – write a visual design journal/blog entry comparing the symbol on the slide to the modern ampersand
    3. slide five – discuss
    4. slide six – watch the two videos and complete sketching activity
    5. slide seven – complete the research activity on the Ian Fleming website, study the rules for the 27th letter competition, create an entry and document the process in their blog
    6. slide ten – answer questions 1-3 in their visual design journal and upload to their blog.
  2. write and document all the special symbols they can think of. For example # $ @ % (only using typographic symbols – emoji’s will be explored later)
  3. participate in a class discussion about the various symbols they thought of and their uses
  4. using computers, find a list of the special characters available on a keyboard
  5. in groups, research a selection of their favourite symbols
  6. create an A3 poster (analogue or digital) that lists the special character and how and where it is used by designers
  7. research the history of their chosen symbols and write a presentation for the class
  8. present and discuss.

Design making

Materials required

Watch the clip New letter for 'The' - Ћ - invented (00:01:51).

Students will:

  • think of a word that may be in use now, that has only been used in popular culture/media for a short amount of time. Words like groovy, cool, swell, rad, wicked etc. that come in and out of fashion
  • complete the alphabet worksheet (PDF 3.12MB)
  • make a large poster of their word tracing over the created letters in the alphabet worksheet
  • upload the poster to their blog with a description of the letter and its sound.

Communicate

Students will complete a digital blog/visual design journal documenting the ideas and processes used throughout this sequence. This can be completed through one-note, Class Notebook or Google classroom.

The blog/visual design journal should contain:

  • the process and technical skills used in practical classes
  • personal reflections about the practical activities
  • information gained through investigations or class discussions
  • answers to questions asked in class
  • a glossary of new words and terminology with graphic examples
  • and thoughts of the different techniques and types explored.

Differentiation

Extension

Teachers are encouraged to provide students with acceleration activities if required.

Students could:

  • create a 1-minute promotional clip to introduce their new 27th letter design
  • design a print advertising campaign for their letter
  • write a blog post addressing the driving question.

Life skills

Life skills outcomes

LS.2 explores a variety of materials, techniques and processes

LS.3 explores the function of a variety of visual designers and audiences

LS.9 uses a range of materials, techniques and processes to make visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus © NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Students could:

  • create a table that includes all the shift/numbers of the qwerty keyboard. For example - !@#$%^&*
  • photograph signs that contain any symbols and explain them by presenting to the class with accompanying drawings.

Evaluate

Formative assessment can be used to determine learning progress throughout the lesson sequences. Teachers should informally assess a student’s level of understanding and adapt accordingly.

Reference list and resources

Duration: 2 weeks

Driving question

How might a ligature evolve in a technology based design world?

Overview

Students will explore and investigate the historical convention of conjoining more than one letter to make their own ligature for their use in typographic designs. Through the design process, students will investigate how typography has been, and will continue to be, used to enhance messages by creating visually appearing content.

Stage 5 outcomes

A student:

5.4 investigates and responds to the world as a source of ideas, concepts and subject matter for visual design artworks

5.5 makes informed choices to develop and extend concepts and different meanings in their visual design artworks

5.6 selects appropriate procedures and techniques to make and refine visual design artworks

5.7 applies their understanding of aspects of practice to critically and historically interpret visual design artworks

5.10 constructs different critical and historical accounts of visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Content

This sequence explores the historical use of ligatures in script and movable type prints. Students will explore the ever-changing use of letterforms and contemporary use of ligatures in display and hand-written typography.

Focus areas
  • Shape and letterform
  • Historical and post-modern frames
  • Design, design world and audience.

Cross-curriculum content and key competencies

Information and communication technology

Work, Employment and Enterprise

Multicultural

Numeracy

Literacy

Assessment

All activities require students to demonstrate their learning and are all assessment for learning activities.

Teaching and learning activities

Introduction

Students will:

  1. work through the Ligatures PowerPoint (PPTX 10.46MB) as a class, completing the exercises below:
    1. slide two – answer questions in their blog/visual design journal
    2. slide five – answer questions in their blog/visual design journal
    3. slide six – watch the short film Farewell – ETAOIN SHRDLU – 1978 (00:29:19).
    4. slide eleven – complete the exercise
  2. use the TEEEC worksheet (PDF 3.09MB) to write a paragraph focusing on use of figures in modern design through the perspective of the historical frame
  3. find a product logo that uses ligature as part of their brand identity. Complete a TEEEC paragraph about it from the perspective of the post-modern frame
  4. read the Analysing web sources worksheet (PDF 3.09MB)
  5. research and define ‘Cursive writing’ in their visual design journal/blog, referencing any images or information accordingly
  6. design and write an example of their definitions and upload to their blog
  7. work in groups to create a large venn diagram outlining the similarities and differences between a ligature and cursive writing.

Design making

Materials required
  • computer and printer
  • A4 white paper
  • A3 coloured paper
  • felt tip markers
  • tracing paper
  • coloured pencils or paints
  • phone or digital camera.

Students will:

  • research motivational posters on the internet or through the CreativeArts712 Pinterest Visual Design board
  • copy and paste their favourite into their blog, reference the original source, and write a reflection as to why it is their favourite
  • write and design their own motivational message/saying
  • choose and print a display font from any computer program, that they think will best be suited for their own motivational poster
  • copy the saying onto an A4 paper with the font from above and experiment with the size of the individual letters, alignment and direction
  • locate any letters that can be joined or overlapped
  • sketch a new version joining those letters together on coloured A3 paper, outlining the font in black felt tipped marker
  • document and photograph for the blog
  • exhibit and discuss with the class.

Communicate

Students will complete a digital blog/visual design journal documenting the ideas and processes used throughout this sequence. This can be completed through one-note, Class Notebook or Google classroom.

The blog/visual design journal should contain:

  • the process and technical skills used in practical classes
  • personal reflections about the practical activities
  • information gained through investigations or class discussions
  • answers to questions asked in class
  • a glossary of new words and terminology with graphic examples
  • and thoughts of the different techniques and types explored.

Differentiation

Extension

Teachers are encouraged to provide students with acceleration activities if required.

Students could:

  • create their own font on photoshop using ligatures. An Introduction to photoshop worksheet can be used to help introduce the skills required for this
  • use the font to create a motivational poster
  • write a blog post addressing the driving question.

Life skills

Life skills outcomes

LS.1 experiences a variety of visual design procedures to make visual design artworks

LS.4 explores ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in visual design artworks

LS.6 makes a variety of visual design artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point of view

LS.7 explores a variety of subject matter that can be represented in visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Students could:

  • research motivational posters online or on Pinterest
  • discuss why they like it
  • print and cut out the letters on the poster
  • rearrange and overlap the letters on a coloured background
  • glue and share with classmates.

Evaluate

Formative assessment can be used to determine learning progress throughout the lesson sequences. Teachers should informally assess a student’s level of understanding and adapt accordingly.

Reference list and resources

Duration: 2-3 weeks

Driving question

Is Graffiti a legitimate form of Art and Typography?

Overview

Students will investigate how symbols and codes are used by communities as information systems. They will create type forms and symbols that serve as a contemporary form of graphic expression and communication. Students will design for personal objects such as skateboards and mobile phones.

Stage 5 outcomes

A student:

5.4 investigates and responds to the world as a source of ideas, concepts and subject matter for visual design artworks

5.5 makes informed choices to develop and extend concepts and different meanings in their visual design artworks

5.6 selects appropriate procedures and techniques to make and refine visual design artworks

5.8 uses their understanding of the function of and relationships between artist – artwork –world – audience in critical and historical interpretations of visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Content

Students will design a series of works based on appropriated traditional typography and reinvent as an identity influenced by the study of varied subcultures.

Focus areas
  • Shape, colour, form and layout
  • Historical and postmodern frames
  • Design, design world and audience.

Cross-curriculum content and key competencies

Civics and citizenship

Work, Employment and Enterprise

Information and communication technology

Numeracy

Literacy

Assessment

All activities require students to demonstrate their learning and are all assessment for learning activities.

Teaching and learning activities

Introduction

Students will:

  1. through a class discussion explore the questions:
    1. What is a sub-culture?
    2. Why are the appearances and fashions of a sub-culture so important?
  2. make a list of sub-cultures in their process diaries/blog. For example, surfies, soccer fans, goths, punks, hip hop etc.
  3. work through the Graffiti type and symbols PowerPoint (PPTX 5.45MB) as a class, completing the exercises below:
    1. slide four – answer questions 1 & 2 in their visual design journal or blog
    2. slide five – answer questions 1 & 2 in their visual design journal or blog
  4. answer in their progress diary/blog:
    1. what influences do sub-cultures have on the mainstream?
    2. compare and contrast hobo glyphs and graffiti culture through a Venn diagram.

Design making

Materials required
  • MDF board, cardboard or skateboard design template – hard and soft copy
  • access to paint, coloured pencils and felt tip makers
  • mobile phones, video cameras or laptops.
Skateboard design

Students will:

  1. watch the videos
    1. How to: Create custom skateboard graphics (00:01:45)
    2. Painting on a skate desk for Waffurusōru (00:03:08)
  2. choose a word as an ‘identity’
  3. write the word in the font they developed in the ligatures sequence
  4. develop the word into a graffiti looking street design
  5. transfer the designs on a MDF board cut in the shape of a skateboard deck
  6. paint the design
  7. exhibit.
Symbols and video

Students will:

  • create a chart of symbols and meanings to a particular sub-culture of their creation. A copy of the Hobo Code can be found here as an example:Picture 2
  • create a short video using their phones about ‘A day in the life of a Hobo’. Play and discuss as a class.

Communicate

Students will complete a digital blog/visual design journal documenting the ideas and processes used throughout this sequence. This can be completed through one-note, Class Notebook or Google classroom.

The blog/visual design journal should contain:

  • the process and technical skills used in practical classes
  • personal reflections about the practical activities
  • information gained through investigations or class discussions
  • answers to questions asked in class
  • a glossary of new words and terminology with graphic examples
  • and thoughts of the different techniques and types explored.

Differentiation

Extension

Teachers are encouraged to provide students with acceleration activities if required.

Students could:

  • create a brand poster by adding text and a company slogan
  • develop an advertising campaign for a skateboard company
  • using photoshop only, design 3 different skateboard decks using the layer technique. A png template (PNG 543.47KB) for photoshop has been provided. For help with layers go the Adobe About photoshop layers website.
  • write a blog post addressing the driving question.

Life skills

Life skills outcomes

LS.1 experiences a variety of visual design procedures to make visual design artworks

LS.4 explores ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in visual design artworks

LS.6 makes a variety of visual design artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point of view

LS.7 explores a variety of subject matter that can be represented in visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Students could:

  • draw their names in block letters onto the skateboard deck template or wood
  • with paint, colour the letters
  • outline in black and add lighting bolts or other symbols to the design
  • discuss why they used the colours and symbols used in their design.
Evaluate

Formative assessment can be used to determine learning progress throughout the lesson sequences. Teachers should informally assess a student’s level of understanding and adapt accordingly.

Reference list and resources

Duration: 3 weeks

Driving question

Could emojis completely replace words and text?

Overview

Students will use analog and digital technologies including, drawing, illustration, 3D construction and digital manipulations to create an emoji. They will research and explore the function of public visual communications and how they create meaning.

Stage 5 outcomes

A student:

5.4 investigates and responds to the world as a source of ideas, concepts and subject matter for visual design artworks

5.5 makes informed choices to develop and extend concepts and different meanings in their visual design artworks

5.6 selects appropriate procedures and techniques to make and refine visual design artworks

5.8 uses their understanding of the function of and relationships between artist – artwork –world – audience in critical and historical interpretations of visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Content

Students will design a series of works based on appropriated traditional typography and reinvent as an identity influenced by the study of varied subcultures.

Focus areas
  • Shape, colour, form and layout
  • Structural and subjective frames
  • Design, design world and audience.

Cross-curriculum content and key competencies

Difference and Diversity

Work, Employment and Enterprise

Information and communication technology

Literacy

Assessment

All activities require students to demonstrate their learning and are all assessment for learning activities.

Teaching and learning activities

Introduction

Students will:

  1. discuss how emojis have become part of our means of communication
  2. work through the Emoji PowerPoint (PPTX 11.23MB) as a class, completing the exercises below:
    1. slide four – 1: Watch the video The History of Emoji (00:04:52) 2: Read the article Emoji – Japan’s talking pictures 3: Create timeline in your visual design journal/blog detailing the evolvement of the emoji over time.
    2. Slide six – 1: Use the internet to find another company who use emojis in their advertising campaign. 2: Write a report on how effective it was.
    3. slide seven – 1: What are some examples of culture specific emojis? 2: Why are they important? 3: How are emojis culturally sensitive to varying skin colours and beliefs? 4: Could this be improved?
  3. write a TEEEC paragraph on each question below in their visual design journal/blog. The frames infographic can provide extra assistance if needed:
    1. structural frame - how do emojis look?
    2. subjective frame – what do emojis represent?
    3. cultural frame – how have emojis developed into their present form?
    4. post-modern frame – how have emojis entered our cultural landscape? For example, film.
  4. Watch The Emoji Movie – official trailer (00:02:38).

Design making

Materials required
  • visual design journal
  • computer and printer
  • coloured pencils or paints
  • phone or digital camera
  • clay.

Emoji study

Students will:

  • in pairs, work through the emoji menu on their phone and select
    • their favourite
    • one they don’t understand
    • their least favourite.
  • create a bank of emojis in their visual design journal by drawing each one
  • ask every student in the class to pick their top three designs as well as their least favourite emoji
  • using a computer, graph the results
  • present to the class the results of the study, using visual enhancements from your visual design journal.

Personalised emoji

Students will:

  • take photos of a classmates partner using different expressions such as, happy, sad, angry, upset, bashful, embarrassed etc.
  • print them out
  • overlay tracing paper on them and outline the facial features
  • create their own emojis using the facial features from the photographs of their friends
  • give each emoji a name
  • upload them into their blog and outline the design process.

Clay activity

Students will:

  • using a slab of clay, sculpt a 10cm x 10cm 3D version of their favourite personalized emoji
  • glaze or paint if using air drying clay
  • photograph their finished emoji in a variety of positions and scenarios around the school
  • upload the photographs and write a story to accompany them in their blog.

Emoji Genre

Students will:

  • design a series of posters defining each genre of literacy below
    • animal fiction
    • autobiography, biography, memoir (one poster)
    • fantasy
    • graphic novels
    • greek mythology
    • historical fiction
    • informational
    • mystery
    • poetry
    • realistic fiction
    • science fiction
    • science fiction
    • sports fiction
    • traditional literature.
  • each poster must have the literacy genre, a definition and the relevant emojis from the emoji family
  • students will describe the design process and use of the emojis in their visual design journal/blog.

Emoji-provisation

Students will:

  • in groups, create a short story using only traditional emojis, about an event that happened either on the way to or from school
  • swap their stories with another group
  • stand at the front of the classroom, and perform their scenarios in their groups (in an improvisation style)
  • the group that wrote the story being performed, students will need to say whether they interpreted the story correctly, or incorrectly
  • reflect in their visual design journal/blog on how effective they were at interpreting the story from the emoji, and how it could’ve been improved.

Communicate

Students are to complete a digital blog/visual design journal documenting the ideas and processes used throughout this sequence. This can be completed through one-note, Class Notebook or Google classroom.

The blog/visual design journal should contain:

  • the process and technical skills used in practical classes
  • personal reflections about the practical activities
  • information gained through investigations or class discussions
  • answers to questions asked in class
  • a glossary of new words and terminology with graphic examples
  • and thoughts of the different techniques and types explored.

Differentiation

Extension

Teachers are encouraged to provide students with acceleration activities if required.

Students could:

Life skills

Life skills outcomes

LS.1 experiences a variety of visual design procedures to make visual design artworks

LS.4 explores ways in which experiences of the world can be communicated in visual design artworks

LS.6 makes a variety of visual design artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point of view

LS.7 explores a variety of subject matter that can be represented in visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Students could:

  • create a list of their favourite emojis in their visual design journal/blog
  • allocate a feeling to each of their favourite emojis such as sad, happy, etc
  • draw their own emoji and give it a name
  • create a large poster by cutting out and printing, and gluing their favourite emojis onto a piece of cardboard.
Evaluate

Formative assessment can be used to determine learning progress throughout the lesson sequences. Teachers should informally assess a student’s level of understanding and adapt accordingly.

Reference list and resources

Duration: 3 weeks

Driving question

How can we use illustrations to make reading easier?

Overview

Students will study the history and development of the illuminated manuscript. They will investigate and explore the process that medieval scribes used, the graphic materials and techniques, and compare it to processes used today. Students will design a contemporary decorative illuminated text which incorporates personalised typography, stylised images and letterforms.

Stage 5 outcomes

A student:

5.4 investigates and responds to the world as a source of ideas, concepts and subject matter for visual design artworks

5.5 makes informed choices to develop and extend concepts and different meanings in their visual design artworks

5.6 selects appropriate procedures and techniques to make and refine visual design artworks

5.8 uses their understanding of the function of and relationships between artist – artwork –world – audience in critical and historical interpretations of visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Content

Students will explore personalising typography. They will investigate how historical books have influenced the work of contemporary designer’s graphic techniques and analyse how they communicate meaning.

Focus areas
  • Lines, shape, colour and image
  • Structural and Cultural frames
  • Design, and design world.

Cross-curriculum content and key competencies

Difference and Diversity

Information and communication technology

Multicultural

Assessment

All activities require students to demonstrate their learning and are all assessment for learning activities.

Teaching and learning activities

Introduction

Students will:

  1. work through the Illuminated manuscripts PowerPoint (PPTX 6.89 MB) as a class, completing the exercises below:
    1. slide four – watch and summarise the videos Making illuminated Manuscripts (00:06:13) and The Structure of a Medieval Manuscript (00:02:08).
    2. slide seven – use the internet to find examples of manuscripts from other cultures. Write in visual design journal/blog
    3. slide eight –
      1. Why is this manuscript called the ‘Book of hours’?
      2. What was the purpose of the book of hours?
      3. How is repetition used in the images?
      4. Brainstorm 5 modern organisational tools that could be changed to an illuminated manuscript.
      5. Watch the video The Medieval Calendar (00:04:29).
    4. slide 9 – use the Comparing manuscript illustrations handout (PDF 5.38MB) to answer the questions below.
      1. What are the similarities and differences between the two manuscripts?
      2. Are there any images or symbols that have remained the same?
      3. How have illuminated manuscripts developed over time?
      4. How could they be used in the future?
    5. slide 10 –
      1. compose a 1-page biography for Graeme Base.
      2. write a TEEEC paragraph on his art style, artworks and creative process
      3. What makes his work unique, yet similar to illuminated manuscripts?
      4. design a 10-page children’s book based on Graeme Base’s works.
    6. slide 11 –  watch the video Interview with Children’s Author Graeme Base (00:02:55) and find out more about Graeme Base at: http://graemebase.com/about-graeme/.
  2. create a 3-5 minute animated presentation on PowToon addressing one of the questions below:
  • Who made the illuminated pages of a manuscript?
  • What were illuminated manuscripts used for?
  • What impact did the invention of the printing press have on books?
  • How were upper and lowercase letters used in an illustrated manuscript?
  • How do illustrations depict a narrative or tell a story?

Design making

Materials required:
  • A4 paper
  • baskerville type handout
  • tracing paper
  • visual design journal/blog
  • colour pencils, paints and felt tip markers
  • mobile phones or digital cameras.

Illuminated animal design

Download and print the Baskerville type handout (PDF 3.11MB) to give to students. This sheet contains the font Baskerville required for this exercise.

Students will:

  • draw a 3cm border around an A4 sheet of paper
  • measure and outline a 10cm x10cm square in the top right-hand corner
  • select an animal you wish to illuminate
  • trace an uppercase letter from the Baskerville type handout (PDF 3.11MB) for the first letter their selected animal
  • continue tracing the remainder of the animal name in lower case
  • fill the remainder of the design and letters with simplified and stylized images
  • colour the shapes using a limited palette of blue, green, yellow and red
  • outline in marker pen and use gold paint to finish
  • photograph and upload to their blog.

Remind students to pay careful attention to the typographic anatomy and individual letter shapes when completing this design.

Book of hours – timetable of hours

Students will:

  • select one week of their school timetable
  • allocate 1 A4 piece of paper to each different class in that week
  • design and draw an illustrated manuscript in the style of a book of hours, that indicates the details of each lesson
  • upload the artworks into their blog and outline the design process.

Please note: if students are still concerned about designing and creating in the style of an illuminated manuscript, follow a similar process with the Baskerville type handout (PDF 3.11MB), as outlined in the illuminated animal activity.

Communicate

Students will complete a digital blog/visual design journal documenting the ideas and processes used throughout this sequence. This can be completed through one-note, Class Notebook or Google classroom.

The blog/visual design journal should contain:

  • the process and technical skills used in practical classes
  • personal reflections about the practical activities
  • information gained through investigations or class discussions
  • answers to questions asked in class
  • a glossary of new words and terminology with graphic examples
  • thoughts of the different techniques and types explored.

Differentiation

Extension

Teachers are encouraged to provide students with acceleration activities if required.

Students could:

  • browse modern examples of illuminated manuscripts on the internet or through the CreativeArts712 Pinterest Visual Design board
  • design and make a popular nursery rhyme into an illuminated manuscript
  • write a blog post addressing the driving question.

Life skills

Life skills outcomes

LS.1 experiences a variety of visual design procedures to make visual design artworks

LS.6 makes a variety of visual design artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point of view

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Students could:

  • write a short story of five sentences, based on their trip from home to school. Some students many need assistance with the order of events for their story. An example of events for their sentences could be:
    • woke up
    • left the house
    • what did I see
    • who did I see
    • where did I go
  • draw a picture of each sentence
  • pick a title for their story
  • using the Baskerville type handout, trace the letters of the title onto an A4 page in the top right hand corner
  • completely fill the page with pictures related to their story
  • outline in felt tip marker
  • colour it in.
Evaluate

Formative assessment can be used to determine learning progress throughout the lesson sequences. Teachers should informally assess a student’s level of understanding and adapt accordingly.

Reference list and resources

Duration: 1-2 weeks

Driving question

Could illustrative typography make sketches obsolete?

Overview

By studying the work of Australian designer Gemma O’Brien, students will gain knowledge and experience in personalising typography. Students will use stylised images and letterforms to create a contemporary decorative text.

Stage 5 outcomes

A student:

5.4 investigates and responds to the world as a source of ideas, concepts and subject matter for visual design artworks

5.7 applies their understanding of aspects of practice to critically and historically interpret visual design art works

5.8 uses their understanding of the function of and relationships between artist – artwork –world – audience in critical and historical interpretations of visual design artworks

5.9 uses the frames to make different interpretations of visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Content

Students will explore, apply and design typographic forms that combine pictures and words. They will create a new graphic that functions as both a letter and a word. Students will be introduced to the concepts and possibilities when experimenting with alternative surfaces to communicate with an audience.

Focus areas
  • Shape and letterform
  • Structural and subjective frames
  • Design and audience.

Cross-curriculum content and key competencies

Civics and citizenship

Work, employment and enterprise

Information and communication technology

Assessment

All activities require students to demonstrate their learning and are all assessment for learning activities.

Teaching and learning activities

Introduction

Students will:

Image: ‘Fear’ from https://www.theloop.com.au/mrseaves/portfolio/lovefear/260995, accessed 18/01/2018.

Image: ‘Love’ from https://www.theloop.com.au/mrseaves/portfolio/lovefear/260995, accessed 18/01/2018.

Design making

Materials required
  • A3 paper
  • tracing paper
  • visual design journal/blog
  • colour pencils, watercolours, paints and felt tip markers
  • white or gesso paint
  • mobile phone or digital camera
  • smooth surface object not exceeding 30cm x 30cm x 30cm.

Haiku

A haiku is a form of Japanese poetry that has 17 syllables broken into three lines of five, seven and five syllables.

Students will:

  • compose a haiku about any topic of their choice
  • choose a font on the computer that will outline the words in their haiku
  • print out the word and trace onto tracing paper
  • transfer the word onto an A3 sized paper
  • illustrate the inside of each letter
  • design and manipulate the words to blend into the background
  • paint to complete the design
  • exhibit
  • reflect on the design process and journey in their visual design journal/blog.

Shapes and text

Students will:

  • select a smooth surfaced object to use in their design. Some examples might be a box, a ball or a bottle.
  • paint the object white using paint or preferably gesso, as it is easier to draw on
  • choose two words with opposite meanings similar to ‘Fear’ and ‘Love’ used by Gemma O’Brien
  • using only black and white, draw an illustrative text design for their words on paper or compose it using Photoshop or Illustrator
  • include a pattern
  • consider positive and negative space/images coming through and over letters
  • transfer the design to the object with black marker pen or black ink
  • paint their design - if on Photoshop or Illustrator, experiment with brush strokes and patterns
  • photograph the creative process and publish onto their blog.

Communicate

Students will complete a digital blog/visual design journal documenting the ideas and processes used throughout this sequence. This can be completed through one-note, Class Notebook or Google classroom.

The blog/visual design journal should contain:

  • the process and technical skills used in practical classes
  • personal reflections about the practical activities
  • information gained through investigations or class discussions
  • answers to questions asked in class
  • a glossary of new words and terminology with graphic examples
  • and thoughts of the different techniques and types explored.

Differentiation

Extension

Teachers are encouraged to provide students with acceleration activities if required.

Students could:

  • research the following artists
    • Zuzana Licko
    • Jonathan Hoefler
    • Tobias Frere-Jones.
  • Investigate and answer the question – Who was Mrs Eaves?
  • curate an exhibition of the classes finished graphic design objects in a space within the school e.g. library, or foyer
  • name the exhibition and create hand-written invitations
  • write a blog post addressing the driving question.

Life skills

Life skills outcomes

LS.1 experiences a variety of visual design procedures to make visual design artworks

LS.2 explores a variety of materials, techniques and processes

LS.8 explores ways to develop ideas in visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Students could:

Evaluate

Formative assessment can be used to determine learning progress throughout the lesson sequences. Teachers should informally assess a student’s level of understanding and adapt accordingly.

Reference list and resources

Duration: 5-6 weeks

Driving question

How can we improve the use of space in visual design?

Overview

Students will be introduced to three different grid systems created to enhance graphic design work. They will compare the work of Jan Tschiochold and his typography rules used for designing the style of Penguin books, to that of David Carson. Students will also explore the use of grids in modern design and architecture throughout history. They will discover how the rules of design have broken and adapted through alternative and emerging subculture scenes of early postmodernism. Students will explore the roles of graphic design and complete a zine portfolio which exhibits their body of work throughout sequences 1-8.

Stage 5 outcomes

A student:

5.4 investigates and responds to the world as a source of ideas, concepts and subject matter for visual design artworks

5.6 selects appropriate procedures and techniques to make and refine visual design artworks

5.7 applies their understanding of aspects of practice to critically and historically interpret visual design art works

5.8 uses their understanding of the function of and relationships between artist – artwork –world – audience in critical and historical interpretations of visual design artworks

5.9 uses the frames to make different interpretations of visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Content

Students will explore the use of the grid in graphic design. They will investigate and create, by examining the grids function for readability and consistency on the printed page and websites. They will study historical changes in graphic design and typography that occurred following the desktop publishing revolution and the development of digital layout programs. Students will explore and participate in various roles in the graphic design industry and showcase a body of work through the publication of a zine.

Focus areas
  • Layout, composition and balance
  • Structural and cultural frames
  • Design and audience.

Cross-curriculum content and key competencies

Work, employment and enterprise

Information and communication technology

Literacy

Numeracy

Assessment

All activities require students to demonstrate their learning and are all assessment for learning activities.

Teaching and learning activities

Introduction

Students will:

  1. work through the Grid Systems PowerPoint (PPTX 11.81MB) as a class, completing the exercises below:
    1. slide two - watch the video Beginning Graphic Design: Layout & Composition (00:05:14) taking notes in your visual design journal or blog. Write definitions and provide examples on the following terms
      1. layout
      2. composition
      3. proximity
      4. white Space
      5. alignment
      6. contrast
      7. repetition.
    2. slide three – research and describe:
      1. find an example of Tschichold’s work.
      2. in their visual design journal/blog explain the layout and composition addressing each element as per your definitions.
    3. slide four – activity
      1. write a list of a compositor’s tools from the Letterpress commons website.
      2. using the internet, write a blog listing the composition rules for Penguin books design by Tschichold.
    4. slide seven - use the websites Thinking with type and Envatotuts+ Design Theory, research and answer the following questions in their visual design journal or blog:
      1. What is the purpose of a Hang line?
      2. Define and describe the function of the Modular Grid.
      3. How does the Baseline Grid differ to the Hang line or Modular Grid?
  2. work through the David Carson sway, taking notes through the interview on the last page
    1. Alternatively, you can download a copy of the sway as a handout (PDF 3.52MB).
  3. visit David Carsons website and write a blog reflection on his career, processes and art. Answer the question
    1. How has David Carson managed to advance graphic design by breaking the rules?
  4. research and write definitions for the following terms in their visual design journal/blog
    1. balance
    2. tension
    3. unity
    4. juxtaposition
  5. design and make a page that demonstrates each of the design principals from above (an example is shown below). Experiment with collage and different textured backgrounds.

Image from https://i.pinimg.com/564x/4a/96/44/4a9644407147ce72ea1c7881d815f024.jpg, accessed 10/12/2017

Design roles and zine publications

Students will:

  • research and complete a table set out like the image belowdesign role table example
  • complete the Design roles kahoot quiz
  • research and compose a blog post dedicated to one of the designers below, providing examples of their work
    • Vaughan Oliver
    • Simon Larbalestier
    • Marc Atkins
    • Nigel Grierson
  • read the article Bedroom zine culture still thriving the internet age and watch the included video
  • using the internet, answer the following questions
    • What is a zine?
    • How are they made?
    • When did they originate?
    • Are their rules for zine making?
    • Define DIY publishing.
    • What role can zines have in creating closer communities?
    • Is Pinterest a zine? Why?
  • locate and paste examples of the following components of a zine:
    • a hand drawn and coloured publication
    • any alternative formats.

Design making

Materials required
  • white paper
  • coloured paper
  • scissors
  • phones or cameras
  • printed text examples
  • cardboard
  • glue
  • visual design journal/blog.

Making Grids

Students will:

  • draw a 1cm border on a piece of paper that is 20cm x 20cm
  • divide the centre square into 3cm x 6cm columns and rows with 5 cm gutters (the border around each of the 9 squares)
  • cut squares and rectangles from coloured paper and make as many new variations of a multigrid with hang lines (see the example below)
  • grid layout examples

Image from https://gdblogs.shu.ac.uk/b1001751/wp-content/uploads/sites/105/2015/01/gdnb_grid-design_1-2.gif, accessed on 24/01/2018.

  • photograph and reflect on the design process in their visual design journal/blog.

It is important to remind students that the best layouts contain white space.

Carson photoshop magazine and album covers

Using a computer and a software such as Photoshop, students will:

  • design a grid to structure a magazine font cover
  • layer various images of type or examples from their illustrative text sequence, on another layer add images on top of this. Play with the transparency
  • follow the steps above to design an album cover for their favourite song
  • reflect on the design process in their visual design journal/blog.

Zine publication

Using a computer, students will design a zine publication showcasing all of their completed designs. Students will:

  1. photograph any work or text that has not been uploaded into their online blog
  2. save in a folder on the computer desktop for easy access
  3. using illustrator, photoshop, publisher or InDesign, create a master page for multipage document
  4. set margins, gutters and columns to make a flexible modular grid
  5. add experimental typography designs and colour to each page
  6. design each page as a unique piece of art
  7. create a new image for the front cover and give their zine publication a title
  8. print and bind using a staple or an alternative binding technique
  9. exhibit their zine publication.

Communicate

Students will complete a digital blog/visual design journal documenting the ideas and processes used throughout this sequence. This can be completed through one-note, Class Notebook or Google classroom.

The blog/visual design journal should contain:

  • the process and technical skills used in practical classes
  • personal reflections about the practical activities
  • information gained through investigations or class discussions
  • answers to questions asked in class
  • a glossary of new words and terminology with graphic examples
  • thoughts of the different techniques and types explored.

Differentiation

Extension

Teachers are encouraged to provide students with acceleration activities if required.

Students could:

  • track the development of the Penguins book covers
  • write an article and design an accompanying magazine spread
  • write a blog post addressing the driving question
  • design a poster advertising their zine publication
  • create a stop-motion short video advertising the publication.

Life skills

Life skills outcomes

LS.1 experiences a variety of visual design procedures to make visual design artworks

LS.2 explores a variety of materials, techniques and processes

LS.6 makes a variety of visual design artworks that reflect experiences, responses or a point of view

LS.7 explore a variety of subject matter that can be represented in visual design artworks

Visual Design 7-10 Syllabus© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2004.

Students could:

  • discuss where they have seen grids used in their day to day life
  • complete the grid activity from above with assistance
  • print out a grid template from online and get them to colour the different sections in varying colours
  • trace over a magazine inlay, identifying where the main lines fall
  • create a Carson style collage:
    • collage different examples of printed text onto a piece of cardboard, cut and tear
    • cut out simple shapes of animals on black or white paper
    • glue the animal cut-outs over the text collage.

Students could:

  • photograph other students work
  • import their pictures into a word document or powerpoint
  • add tites and descriptive text for each page
  • export the document as a PDF or print it out
  • bind it together and share with the class.
Evaluate

Formative assessment can be used to determine learning progress throughout the lesson sequences. Teachers should informally assess a student’s level of understanding and adapt accordingly.

Reference list and resources

Plain versions of the handouts in the tabs above are available for download as word documents.

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