Transcript of Introduction: Creating tuneful trash video

Transcript of Introduction: Creating tuneful trash video

Music

Ruth Goodwin: At Chittaway Bay Public School we have a very strong creative arts program and students who are involved in that program show positive outcomes in all of their learning. So, music in the classroom doesn’t have to be formal or it doesn’t have to be about performances, it’s about teachers looking at ways to engage in all sorts of areas regularly and strategically when they’re teaching children in the classroom.

Julia Brennan I’ve come today to Chittaway Bay Public School because we’re working with a fantastic teacher there called Jade Myers. And Jade, I’ve been watching because she’s been working with her students on incorporating science into music and mathematics and those sorts of things.

She’s got the students looking at junk that she’s found in the playground or that they’ve brought in, they’re designing and making their own instruments. Then, they’re using that to create a fantastic music unit and it looks at all the concepts that are in music as well as looking through the experiences of organising sound or creating their own compositions, they’re performing and they’re listening to each other.

She’s also been helped by a local community member, Phil Rees, and they’ve just done some amazing things with just using recycled and found sounds.

The STEAM process is looking at science and technology, engineering and mathematics but now we’re adding in an ‘a’ for the arts. We’ve got students making instruments, they’re being creative, using visual arts to make their instruments look beautiful as well as using music throughout the whole project, it’s a very exciting process.

Student 1: We can put more in. Maybe it makes the pitch higher or lower. I think it might be higher.

Student 2: Or we could write our names on the sticky tape …

Student 3: The metal pole and this metal pole would sound like a gong if we put it together.

Student 4: We could use this black scraper and …

Jade Myers: Well, the performance actually allows the students to learn about the musical concepts as well as learning to write their own music and be familiarised with the music of other people. And it’s also great because all ages can get involved.

Now, they look like they’re all filled up to different levels with water. Is that right?

Yeah.

Yeah, can we have a listen to how they sound? They all sound a bit different, some are higher and some are lower, well done, Coco.

Looks like you’ve got a little flute there. Can we have a listen, Carla?

Wow, it makes the sounds higher the more fingers you lift up.

Student: I tried to make a guitar with a box and tried to put rubber bands but that wasn’t loud enough and we thought that we could get a bucket and put a piece of wood underneath so the sound could come out and if we can pluck it like that.

Julia Brennan: Why does that drum make it louder than the tissue box do you think?

Student: Because it’s bigger.

Jade Myers: And have you got any way of changing the sound? Wow, as you shorten that string, does the sound get higher or lower?

Student Higher.

Jade Myers: It’s higher.

What have we made there, Bradley?

Bradley (student): A horn.

Jade Myers A horn. Can we hear it?

Bradley: I used a hose, half a bottle and duct tape and a mouthpiece. This one gave me out of breath and then we tried the trumpet mouthpiece and then the skipping rope handle and the skipping rope handle worked.

Music

End of transcript

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