Stage 3 music lesson ideas

Timbre

Outcomes MUS3.2, MUS3.4

Outcomes and other elements of the syllabus used are copyright.

K–6 Creative Arts Syllabus
© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2006.

Introduction

  • Inform students that timbre is the quality of a sound
  • Play a soundscape that is based on the seaside such as Fingal's Cave by Mendelssohn and ask the students what sounds they can hear
  • Discuss what instruments could make these sounds.

Body

  • Break class up into four groups
  • Each group will create their own soundscape with a different theme
  • Themes could include, the park, a schoolyard, a theme park or a rainforest
  • Give students a range of household items such as newspaper or tinfoil and a selection of available instruments
  • Allow students approximately 20 minutes in their groups to create their soundscape.

Conclusion

  • Students play their piece to the class
  • Ask audience what they think the group's theme is
  • Ensure all groups have a turn performing to the class.

Ashfield Public School as part of MyPL RG02217 Introduction to Music within the K-6 Creative Arts Syllabus

Structure and Timbre

Outcomes MUS3.1, MUS3.2, MUS3.4

Outcomes and other elements of the syllabus used are copyright.

K–6 Creative Arts Syllabus (2006)
© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2003.

Introduction

Background Knowledge: students will have read the text Free Diving by Lorrae Coffin. They have discussed the rhyming nature of the text as well as have examined the visual literacy of the text.

  • Reread the text and discuss the sorts of sounds that might be heard on each page
  • Focus on dynamics and tone colour. For example, sounds that would be heard underwater versus sounds out in the bush, sounds that might indicate someone being comforted, seagulls screaming and a captain yelling.
  • Question what percussion instruments could be selected to represent some of the sounds? Would they be loud or soft? Why would you choose those instruments?

Body

  • Students form small groups and experiment with creating a range of sounds to match the concepts in the book
  • Each group chooses their favourite sound and performs to the class a snippet of their idea. The rest of the class identifies which part of the text they are performing.
  • Assign each group a specific portion of the text
  • Provide enough time to select instruments, create percussion sequence and practice it.

Conclusion

  • Students form one large circle in the room
  • All groups perform jointly and then discuss the different effects produced by using different instruments in a variety of combinations.

Metella Road Public School as part of MyPL RG02217 Introduction to Music within the K-6 Creative Arts Syllabus

Timbre

Outcome MUS3.4

Outcomes and other elements of the syllabus used are copyright.

K–6 Creative Arts Syllabus
© NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) for and on behalf of the Crown in right of the State of New South Wales, 2006.

Introduction

Body

  • What is the difference between the two audio sections of the advertisement?  One audio section is ‘musical’, the other is not.
  • Refer to part of Experimental Music by John Cage. Discuss the concept of a range of audio sounds from a bird song to humming, from a washing machine to the ocean as being musical. Re-evaluate if a jackhammer is musical?

Conclusion

  • Explore music that samples a range of audio sounds including Infected Mushroom Heavy Weight (from beginning of the track), David August Epikur (from beginning), Burial Loner (cue to 7 minutes)
  • Have students find their own examples of audio sounds incorporated into music.

Ashfield Public School as part of MyPL RG02217 Introduction to Music within the K-6 Creative Arts Syllabus.

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