NAIDOC Week 2020

Find out how Jarjum Centre, Giiguy Gamambi Preschool and, Dalaigur and Scribbly Gum Dalai Preschool are embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture into their everyday practices.

26 November 2020

‘Always Was, Always Will Be' is the theme of NAIDOC week 2020, a week-long celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture celebrated by all Australians from all walks of life. The week is a great opportunity to participate in a range of activities and to support your local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community while showcasing how you are embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture into your everyday practices.

The following are just a few Aboriginal services we have highlighted on our Facebook page which show how the wonderful educators and students live and breathe their culture.

Jarjum Centre

Jarjum Centre in the Bundjalung Nation (Lismore) had a visit from Gunawirra, an organisation that works with communities to improve the health and wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander mothers and children, and the children learned about traditional ways of living and sustainable practice.

Giiguy Gamambi Preschool

The image below is from a visit from local animal activists who engaged with the children of this service, to educate them and the community about protecting koalas.

In turn, the children taught the activists some of their local language and made a sign with the word ‘Dungirr’ which means 'Koala' in Gumbaynggirr.

You can also see Aunty Pauline teaching local language in groups and one on one!

Dalaigur and Scribbly Gum Dalai Preschool

Based on the Dreamtime story of ‘The King of the Birds’ the children worked with family and community to create hundreds of nests and eggs from clay. In the 18 months leading to the exhibition over 200 artmakers from 2 to 96 years old worked together to create hundreds of nests and eggs. The Dreamtime story was told to the children by Elders, Uncle John Kelly and Aunty Vicky Taylor and was an additional way in which Dhungutti Culture and Language were shared with the children.

The project was led by Dunghutti Elder and artist Uncle John Kelly and facilitated by artist therapist Rena Shein. This artwork shows the possible outcomes of linking together to show the strength of community connection.

The installation was created with the use of woy/canoes which held the hundreds of nests and eggs. The canoes were created by Uncle John in Men’s work carried out in various parts of NSW – a continuation of canoe making which has been done for thousands of years and is a source of strength and cultural reclamation.

This year the work will be shared at the Biennale of Sydney 2020. The 2020 Biennale of Sydney is directed by Brook Andrew, whose work relating to colonisation and power has offered a new way in which Indigenous and non-Indigenous themes are expressed.

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