Supporting students' learning poster

Read online

Background

Alongside effective teaching practices, students need a supportive learning environment to succeed.

Adovocacy at school refers to the support students receive from teachers and other school staff who consistently provide encouragement and who can be turned to for advice.

Advocacy at home refers to the support for learning students receive from their parents and other family members.

Schools and families are important sources of pastoral and academic support during a child's education. Research has shown that when home and school environments from complementary and supportive roles for learning, children do better, stay in school longer, are more engaged with their school work, go to school more regularly, behave better, and have better social skills.

CESE's Supporting students' learning publications explore NSW students' experiences of support as they move through school, and provide strategies for improving support for learning.

Steps schools can take to enhance support for students

Encourage communication

Regular and open communication between teachers and students help to reinforce the message that there is always someone at school who can provide support and advice.

Provide clarity

Make it clear to students whom they can approach, as well as when and where might be best to start a conversation. A flowchart illustrating 'Who can I go to for help on *this topic*' and 'When and where can I find them?' may be helpful.

Undertake professional learning

Consider professional learning opportunities targeting coaching, mental health and student wellbeing so that all staff have the skills and knowledge to respond appropriately to students who may need support.

Support parents

Provide parents and carers with knowledge and skills to help them support their child's learning and engagement. Strategies could include: workshops, providing information on topics and assessments covered each term and developing clear school processes for communicating with families.

Return to top of page Back to top